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Equality Screening - Five Cs Public Realm Project

Equality Screening Template

The Council has a statutory duty to screen. This includes our strategies, plans, policies, legislative developments; and new ways of working such as the introduction, change or end of an existing service, grant funding arrangement or facility. This screening template is designed to help departments consider the likely equality impacts of their proposed decisions on different groups of customers, service users, staff and visitors.    

Before carrying out an equality screening exercise it is important that you have received the necessary training first. To find out about the training needed or any other queries on screening, contact the Equality and Diversity Officer (job-share) Lorraine Dennis on extension 6027or by email equality@belfastcity.gov.uk

The accompanying Screening Guidance note provides straightforward advice on how to carry out equality screening exercises.  Detailed information about the Section 75 equality duties and what they mean in practice is available on the Equality Commission’s website1.

The screening template has 4 sections to complete. These are:

Section A - provides details about the policy / decision that is being screened

Section B – gives information on the consultation process, supporting evidence gathered and has 4 key questions outlining the likely impacts on all equality groups.

Section C - has 4 key questions in relation to obligations under the Disability Discrimination Order

Section D - is the formal record of the screening decision.


Section A

Details about the policy / decision to be screened

1. Title of policy / decision to be screened:-

The Five C’s Public Realm Project

2. Brief description of policy / decision to be screened:-

The Developer Contributions Framework has been produced to provide advice and guidance on Belfast City Council’s approach to securing Developer Contributions as part of the planning application process. The Council has routinely used planning agreements to secure Developer Contributions since the transfer of planning powers to local government in 2015. Their use is supported by legislation and planning policy. The Framework has been produced for use by Developers, Elected Members, the general public and Planning Officers in the assessment of planning applications within the Belfast area.

The Five Cs Project is the first project to be progressed using Developer Contributions. It is a public realm scheme which aims to enhance several areas within Belfast city centre which have recently seen, or will soon see, significant private sector investment, but where the streetscape is poor and in need of improvement. The streets included in this project are adjacent to previous Public Realm Improvement Works completed under Belfast Streets Ahead Phase 1- these improvements emphasize the current poor condition of the project area. The Five Cs project area comprises College Court, College Avenue (from King Street to College Street), College Street (from College Avenue to Queen Street), Callender Street and Chichester Street (south side from Victoria Street to Donegall Square East and the north side from Arthur Street to Callender Street).

The project aims to create a high quality, sustainable public realm with improved surfacing, street lighting, soft landscaping, street furniture and public artwork. The intended outcome is that it will contribute positively to the economic, environmental and social vitality of the project area; that it will encourage business into these areas; that it will create more attractive civic spaces; that it will create or improve safety within these areas that will encourage people to visit, work, shop and live therein. The scheme will be designed in line with current standards and best practice to promote and enable access for all.

3. Aims and objectives of the policy / decision to be screened:

The aims/objectives/outcomes of the Five C’s Project have been devised based on the Public Realm Strategy Principles, the Belfast City Centre Public Realm Masterplan (and update) and are as follows:

  • To have improved the physical appearance of College Court, College Street and College Avenue by investing in improvements to pavements, carriageway and street lighting;
  • To have improved the physical appearance of Chichester Street by investing in improvements to pavements, carriageway, soft landscaping and street lighting;
  • To have improved the physical appearance of Callender Street by investing in improvements to pavements, carriageway and street lighting.

In developing the design for The Five C’s, the project team focused on achieving the following aspirations:

  • To contribute to establishing Belfast as a place where people want to visit, live, work and play
  • A place that local population are proud of and visitors want to return to
  • Design streets to be inclusive
  • Foster economic growth by providing a pleasant environment stimulating inward investment
  • Enhance pedestrian safety for all
  • Improve space for active travel (walking and cycling)
  • Contributing to the sustainability of the city centre through:
  • “Greening” the city
  • Providing infrastructure that contributes to air quality improvements
  • Creating sustainable urban drainage systems where feasible.

4. On whom will the policy / decision impact?

Consider the internal and external impacts (both actual or potential) and explain:

Staff - Yes

Belfast City Council’s City Regeneration and Development Division are working in Partnership with DfC to co- deliver the project and will work closely with colleagues in Place and Economy Department and cross Council Departments to consult on design development and through the construction works stage.

Service users - Yes

It is envisaged that the project will impact on traders, businesses, shoppers and persons using the transport network and streets.

Other public sector organisations - Yes

DfC are the Lead Partner of this project with BCC. Others that will be involved include: DfI, Housing Executive, Transport NI, BCCM, BID ONE.

Voluntary / community groups / trade unions - Yes
IMTAC, Sustrans, RNIB, NI Greenways

Others, please specify - Yes

All those who live in, work in, study, invest in or visits the city.

5. Are there linkages to other Agencies/ Departments?

The Department for Communities (DfC) in partnership with Belfast City Council is planning to deliver public realm improvements in Belfast City Centre. Doran Consulting have been commissioned as the Integrated Design Team.

The Developer Contributions Framework is supported by existing legislation and the current planning policy framework. Linkages include the Strategic Planning Policy Statement for Northern Ireland (SPPS) and other relevant Planning Policy Statement’s which fall under the Department for Infrastructure’s (DfI) Planning Policy Division.


Section B

Information on the consultation process, supporting evidence gathered and has 4 key questions outlining the likely impacts for equality and good relations

6. Outline consultation process planned or achieved

To date, there has been targeted stakeholder engagement and wider public consultation during design development which has been held virtually due to the ongoing Covid-19 Pandemic and in line with Government Guidance on Public Consultation.

Targeted engagement included Elected Members, interest groups (RNIB, IMTAC, Sustrans, NI Greenways, BCCM, BID ONE and the Chamber of Trade and Commerce), as well as representatives from DfI and DfC. Feedback received has enabled Stakeholders to participate in design development that will influence and shape the public realm improvements.

To support access to design information, a project website was set up https://www.thefivecs.info, with a 12 week public consultation period opened from September the 30th 2020 to December the 22nd 2020- comments on the proposals could be left at https://www.thefivecs.info/have-your-say/.

There were three public events held on 8-10 December 2020 via Teams.

User Surveys were publicised through BCC and DfC websites.

Business Surveys were sent by DfC to city centre businesses.

7. Available evidence

What evidence / information (both qualitative and quantitative) have you gathered to inform this policy? Set out all evidence below to help inform your screening assessment.

It is important to record information gathered from a variety of sources such as: monitoring information; complaints; research surveys; consultation exercises from other public authorities.


Policy Context

Developer Contributions Framework

The Council has routinely used planning agreements to secure Developer Contributions since the transfer of planning powers to Local Government in 2015. Their use is supported by Legislation and Planning Policy. The guidance contained in the Framework brings together existing regional and local planning policies on the use of planning agreements and Developer Contributions and sets out the Council’s interpretation of these policies. This Framework has been produced for use by Developers, Elected Members, the general public and by Planning Officers in the assessment of planning applications within the Belfast area.

Regional

The NI Programme for Government (draft), NI Industrial Strategy (draft), the UK Industrial Strategy and the emerging Industrial Programme being developed by the Belfast Region City Deal (BRCD) partners provide clear Policy Frameworks that promote investment and innovation in the growing knowledge economy and tourism sector.

The Regional Development Strategy 2035 (RDS) is the Spatial Strategy for the Northern Ireland Executive and provides an overarching Planning Framework to facilitate and guide development. The RDS provides Regional Guidance (RG) and Spatial Framework Guidance (SFG) under the three sustainable development themes of the Economy, Society and Environment.

The Spatial Framework Guidance 3 (SPG) specifically recognises the need to enhance the distinctive role of Belfast City Centre as the primary retail location in Northern Ireland. In relation to future major retail development proposals, it promotes a precautionary approach to out-of-town shopping development, given the likely adverse impact on the city centre area. The Strategic Planning Policy Statement (SPPS) advocates a town centre approach for the location and future of retailing and other main town centre uses. This policy aims to encourage better decision-making through supporting and sustaining vibrant centres through Local Development Plans (LDPs).

Strategic Planning Policy Statement (SPPS)

A final Equality Screening report was published alongside the SPPS in September 2015. As the high level Strategic Planning Policy Statement for NI, there are no specific policies within the SPPS that directly infringe upon the Framework. However, the screening report notes that the SPPS, and the planning system generally, “is for securing the orderly and consistent development of land across Northern Ireland under a two-tier planning system”. It concludes that “it will be uniformly applied across all Section 75 categories without prejudice” and, as such, “will not positively or negatively discriminate towards” and Section 75 groups. It is, in fact, expected to equally benefit all Section 75 groups”.

Emerging Local Development Plan

The Plan Strategy (draft) was launched at the end of August 2018. ‘Creating a Vibrant Economy’ is one of the primary aims of the plan to strengthen Belfast as the Regional economic driver. It recognises that for our city centre to remain successful, it needs to be the focus for major new investment and retail development. It will encourage a mix of different shops and services and decide where these should be located. The retail policies within the LDP will seek to address current and future retailing needs over the plan period. It will therefore aim to:

  • Provide a range of uses appropriate to the role and function of a city centre which can realise ambitions for growth.
  • Acknowledge the distinctive role of Belfast City Centre as the primary location for retailing in the region.
  • Adopt a sequential approach to the identification of retail and other town centre uses decision making.
  • Maintain and improve accessibility to and within the city centre by supporting connectivity.
  • Support local economies by ensuring continued vibrancy and vitality.
  • Develop a compact urban form that maximises opportunities in the city centre.
  • Provide a focus for economic development.

Belfast Agenda

The vision for Belfast in 2035 set out in the Belfast Agenda is:

Belfast will be a city re-imagined and resurgent. A great place to live and work for everyone. Beautiful, well connected and culturally vibrant, it will be a sustainable city shared and loved by all its citizens, free from the legacy of conflict. A compassionate city offering opportunities for everyone. A confident and successful city energising a dynamic and prosperous city region. A magnet for talent and business and admired around the world. A city people dream to visit.

The Belfast Agenda has ambitious targets of:

  • 46,000 additional jobs
  • 66,000 additional residents
  • Attract over £1 billion in private sector investment
  • Create 4,000 Business Start Ups
  • Grow the City’s Rate Base by 5% through an increased number of residential and commercial developments
  • Increase the percentage of residents satisfied with the city living experience

City Centre Regeneration and Investment Strategy

The City Centre Regeneration and Investment Strategy outlines an exciting vision to develop a world-class city centre for the future.

A thriving city centre is vital to the prosperity of the whole city and the region. Around two-thirds of all jobs in Belfast are located in and around the city centre, so everything that we do to enhance it will benefit the city as a whole.

The strategy sets out our collective ambition for the continued growth and regeneration of the city core and its surrounding areas to 2030. It has been shaped by extensive engagement with stakeholders and contains a roadmap of policies to guide city centre decision-making and key projects that translate those policies into action.

Core Principles

We are determined that the regeneration of our city centre will drive not just economic growth but social benefits. The strategy therefore includes a commitment to ongoing engagement with local people to ensure that the social impact of regeneration is maximised.

The strategy is based on eight core policies. It will aim to:

  • increase the employment population
  • increase the residential population
  • manage the retail offer
  • maximise the tourism opportunity
  • create a regional learning and innovation centre
  • create a green centre, accessible to cyclists and walkers
  • connect to the city around
  • enhance shared space and social impact

Implementation

Now that the strategy has been finalised, the focus will be on delivery to realise aspirations for the city centre by ensuring that the projects, policies and opportunities described are followed through and delivered.

This Strategy sets out Belfast City Council’s ambition for continued growth and regeneration of the city core to 2030 and contains policies to guide decision-making and key projects to drive economic growth and deliver social benefits.

The principles of BCCRIS include increasing the employment and residential population, managing retail, maximising tourism, creating a learning and innovation centre and a green centre. City connectivity, shared space and social impact are also key values. BCCRIS also identifies five special action areas within the city centre which have been progressed through master plans implemented by the Council.

Section 75 category Details of evidence/information and engagement
Religious belief On Census day 2011, 48.8% of the population of Belfast identified as Catholic and 42.5% identified as Protestant. Belfast had a slightly higher percentage of people identifying as “Other” or “None” religion than the NI average.
Religion or religion brought up in: Catholic (%) Religion or religion brought up in: Protestant and Other Christian (including Christian related) (%) Religion or religion brought up in: Other religions (%) Religion or religion brought up in: None (%)
Belfast 48.8 42.5 1.6 7.1
NI 45.1 48.4 0.9 5.6

A study conducted by Queen’s University, 2010, identified Belfast city as a space where people could mingle and feel safe. This study also recognised Belfast as having the potential to be an important area for social change in everyday life.

http://www.conflictincities.org/PDFs/WorkingPaper15rev_11.3.10.pdf

Political opinion The results of the May 2019 Belfast City Council elections were:
Party Total Elected Candidates
Sinn Féin 18
Democratic Unionist Party – D.U.P. 15
Alliance Party 10
Social Democratic and Labour Party – SDLP 6
Green Party Northern Ireland 4
People Before Profit Alliance 3
Progressive Unionist Party of Northern Ireland 2
Ulster Unionist Party - UUP 2

The city centre is a place where people from a variety of political backgrounds live, work, visit and study. This programme aims to create a more vibrant city centre to that will be attractive those who live, work and visit the city.

Issues concerning shared space in the city centre are key to all political communities. 

Racial group

According to the 2011 Census, 96.7% of the population of Belfast are White. The main minority ethnic groups were Chinese, Indian and Mixed ethnic group.

  % Belfast % NI
White 96.7 98.2
Irish Traveller 0.1 0.1
Mixed 0.5 0.3
Indian 0.7 0.3
Pakistani 0.1 0.1
Bangladeshi 0.1 0.03
Other Asian 0.6 0.3
Black Caribbean 0.03 0.02
Black African 0.3 0.1
Other Black 0.1 0.1
Chinese 0.7 0.4
Other ethnic group 0.2 0.1

In addition, migrant workers from the A2 and A8 European Union (EU) Accession countries (Bulgaria, Romania, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia) represented 1.9% of population, with a further 0.7% from other EU countries.

The Census also identified that 4.3% of the Belfast population aged 3 and over did not have English as their main language, which was higher than the NI average of 3.1%. In 2018, the Department for Education identified 3,510 “newcomer” pupils (a newcomer pupil is one who has enrolled in a school but who does not have the satisfactory language skills to participate fully in the school curriculum, and the wider environment, and does not have a language in common with the teacher, whether that is English or Irish) across NI.

While the Census data is the most accurate dataset available on ethnic minorities in NI, in 2020 it is likely to be an underestimation of the ethnic minority population.

Age

According to NISRA 2018 mid-year population estimates, Belfast has a relatively young population with 55.7% of the population aged under 40 compared to 51.6% of the NI population.

  % of population
0-15 years 16-39 years 40-64 years 65+ years
Belfast 19.9 35.8 29.6 14.6
NI 20.9 30.7 31.9 16.3

NISRA projects that by 2041, people under 40 will make up 51.3 per cent of the population, but that the 65+ age bracket will be the fastest growing, comprising 72,245 people or 20.4 per cent of the Belfast population.

Belfast has a growing student population with a number of new Purpose Built Student Accommodation blocks in the city centre and the new Ulster University city centre campus that will see some 15,000 students use the facilities daily.

In 2014, Belfast was the first city in Northern Ireland to join the World Health Organisation’s Global Network of Age Friendly Cities. An age-friendly city is one in which organisations work together to make sure the quality of life for people is enhanced as they age. Belfast City Council is part of the Healthy Ageing Strategic Partnership (HSAP) working with older people to ensure that Belfast is changing to meet the needs and desires of older people.

People from a variety of ages live, work, study and visit the city centre. This programme aims to improve vibrancy and vitality of the city centre

Marital status

On Census day 2011, a higher proportion of Belfast residents aged 16 and over were single, separated, divorced or widowed than the NI resident population. 22.2% of people also lived alone, which was the highest rate across NI where the average was 16.8%. 0.1% or 353 residents were in civil partnerships, almost a third of all such partnerships in NI at that time. This is likely to be higher in 2020.

  % of population
Marital status Belfast NI
Single 45.3 36.1
Married 35.6 47.6
Civil partnership 0.13 0.09
Separated 5.4 4.0
Divorced/civil partnership dissolved 6.2 5.5
Widowed/Surviving civil partner 7.5 6.8

 
Sexual orientation There are currently no or limited statistics that monitor the sexual orientation of the population in NI. The 2018 NI Life and Times found that 94% of respondents identified as “heterosexual or ‘straight’”; 1% as “’gay’ or ‘lesbian’ (homosexual)”; 1% as “bisexual”’ and 1% as “Other” (3% declined to answer). A commonly used estimate of LGBTQ+ people in the UK, accepted by Stonewall UK, is 5 to 7 % of the population.
Men and women generally

According to NISRA 2018 mid-year population estimates, the population of Belfast by gender is broadly even, although there is a higher proportion of older females (59.3% of the over 65 population are female).

  % of population
All ages 0-15 years 16-39 years 40-64 years 65+ years
Male 48.5 10.2 17.7 14.3 6.3
Female 51.5 9.7 18.1 15.3 8.4
Disability

The 2011 Census asked people to what extent a long-term health problem or disability (that is, which has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months) limits their day-to-day activities. At 25.9%, Belfast has a higher proportion of people with a limiting health condition or disability than the general NI population (20.7%).

% Belfast population % NI population
Day-to-day activities limited a lot 14.4 11.9
Day-to-day activities limited a little 11.5 8.8
Day-to-day activities not limited 76.5 79.3
Dependants

The 2011 Census defines a “dependent child” is defined as a person aged under 16 or young person aged 16 to 18 who is a full-time student and living in a family with a parent or grandparent.

The 2011 Census showed that 28.6% of households in Belfast included a dependent child compared to 33.9% of households across NI. Historical Census data shows that the proportion of households with dependent children in both NI and Belfast has been in decline since 1981.

The Belfast City Council 2014 Residents Survey reported that 32.3% of the population have dependents or caring responsibilities. In Belfast in 2018, 15,550 people or 4.5% of the population claimed Carer’s Allowance. (Carer’s Allowance is a non-contributory benefit for people who look after a severely disabled person for at least 35 hours a week.) This was higher than the NI average of 3.9%. Most claimants were female: 62.9% compared to 37.9% male. .

8. What is the likely impact (indicate if the policy impact is positive or negative) on equality of opportunity for those affected by this policy, for each of the Section 75 equality categories?  What is the level of impact? 

Section 75 category If Yes, provide details If No, provide reasons
Religious belief The project aims to regenerate the city centre. It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast. There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group. Minor
Political opinion The project aims to regenerate the city centre. It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast. There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group. Minor
Racial group The project aims to regenerate the city centre. It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast. There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group. Minor
Age The project aims to regenerate the city centre. It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast. There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group. Minor
Marital status The project aims to regenerate the city centre. It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast. There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group. Minor
Sexual orientation The project aims to regenerate the city centre. It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast. There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group. Minor
Men and women generally The project aims to regenerate the city centre. It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast. There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group. Minor
Disability The project aims to regenerate the city centre. It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast. There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group. Minor
 Dependants The project aims to regenerate the city centre. It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast. There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group. Minor

9. Are there opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity for people within the Section 75 equalities categories? 

Section 75 category If Yes, provide details If No, provide reasons
Religious belief The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project and their views have been considered and incorporated into the Concept Design.  
Political opinion The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project and their views have been considered and incorporated into the Concept Design.  
Racial group The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project and their views have been considered and incorporated into the Concept Design.  
Age The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project and their views have been considered and incorporated into the Concept Design.  
Marital status The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project and their views have been considered and incorporated into the Concept Design.  
Sexual orientation The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project and their views have been considered and incorporated into the Concept design.  
Men and women generally The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project and their views have been considered and incorporated into the Concept Design.  
Disability The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project and their views have been considered and incorporated into the Concept Design.  
 Dependants The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project and their views have been incorporated into the Concept Design.  

10. To what extent is the policy likely to impact (positive or negatively) on good relations between people of different religious belief, political opinion or racial group? What is the level of impact?

Good relations category Likely impact? Level of impact? Minor/Major/None
Religious belief It is our belief based on evidence that there would likely be a minor positive impact on people of different religious beliefs in that the proposed actions will provide opportunity for the promotion of a shared, welcoming and vibrant city centre. Minor
Political opinion It is our belief based on evidence that there would likely be a minor positive impact on people of different religious beliefs in that the proposed actions will provide opportunity for the promotion of a shared, welcoming and vibrant city centre. Minor
Racial group It is our belief based on evidence that there would likely be a minor positive impact on people of different religious beliefs in that the proposed actions will provide opportunity for the promotion of a shared, welcoming and vibrant city centre. Minor

11. Are there opportunities to better promote good relations between people of different religious belief, political opinion or racial group?

Good relations category If Yes, provide details If No, provide reasons
Religious belief The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project and their views have been considered and incorporated into the Concept Design.  
Political opinion The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project and their views have been incorporated into the Concept Design.  
Racial group The project will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the design development of this project, their views have been considered and have been incorporated into the Concept Design.  

Section C

Belfast City Council also has legislative obligations to meet under the Disability Discrimination Order and Questions 12-13 relate to these two areas. Consideration of Disability Duties

12. Does this proposed policy / decision provide an opportunity for the Council to better promote positive attitudes towards disabled people?

Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the development of this project and their views have been incorporated into Concept Design.

13. Does this proposed policy / decision provide an opportunity to actively increase the participation by disabled people in public life?

Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the development of this project and their views have been incorporated into Concept Design.

14. Multiple Identities Provide details of data on the impact of the policy with multiple identities

Not applicable.

Specify relevant Section 75 categories concerned.

15. Monitoring Arrangements

Section 75 places a requirement the Council to have equality monitoring arrangements in place in order to assess the impact of policies and services etc; and to help identify barriers to fair participation and to better promote equality of opportunity. Outline what data you will collect in the future in order to monitor the impact of this policy / decision on equality, good relations and disability duties.

Equality

 Good Relations

Disability Duties

Each significant project will address these duties separately

Each significant project will address these duties separately

Each significant project will address these duties separately


Section D

Formal Record of Screening Decision

Title of Proposed Policy / Decision being screened

The Five C’s Public Realm Project

I can confirm that the proposed policy / decision has been screened for –

   

x

equality of opportunity and good relations

x

disabilities duties

On the basis of the answers to the screening questions, I recommend that this policy / decision is – (place an X in the appropriate box below)

   
  *Screened In – Necessary to conduct a full EQIA

  X    

*Screened Out – No EQIA necessary (no impacts)

Provide a brief note here to explain how this decision was reached:

Key Section 75 Stakeholders have been engaged during the development of this project and their views have been incorporated in the design development.

If at a later stage it is deemed necessary for a full EQIA this will be undertaken by the DfC as Lead Partner.

 

*Screened Out - Mitigating Actions (minor impacts)

All necessary consultation and engagement methods have been undertaken with Section 75 Stakeholders regarding the development of the Concept Design in preparation for Full Planning submission. 

This has included extensive consultation methods including: Online presentations, workshops, User and Business surveys, publicly advertised Concept Design document and 3 public events.

It is not deemed necessary at this stage to conduct a full EQIA.

Screening assessment completed by (Officer Level) –

Name: Simon Rees
Date: 11/02/21
Department: Place and Economy

Screening decision approved by –

Name: Richard Griffin
Date: 18/05/21
Department: Place and Economy

For more information about equality screening contact:

Lorraine Dennis Equality and Diversity Officer (job-share)
Belfast City Council
City Hall
Belfast
BT1 5GS
Phone: 028 9027 0511
Email: equality@belfastcity.gov.uk

http://www.equalityni.org/archive/pdf/S75GuideforPublicAuthoritiesApril2010.pdf

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