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Equality and diversity

Equality screening outcome report: City Centre Living Vision

Published in October 2021


Contents


Overview of screening template

The council has a statutory duty to screen. This includes our strategies, plans, policies, legislative developments; and new ways of working such as the introduction, change or end of an existing service, grant funding arrangement or facility. This screening template is designed to help departments consider the likely equality impacts of their proposed decisions on different groups of customers, service users, staff and visitors.    

Before carrying out an equality screening exercise it is important that you have received the necessary training first. To find out about the training needed or any other queries on screening, contact the Equality and Diversity Officer Lorraine Dennis on extension 6027 or or Lisa McKee on extension 6310 by email equality@belfastcity.gov.uk

The accompanying screening guidance note provides straightforward advice on how to carry out equality screening exercises. Detailed information about the Section 75 equality duties and what they mean in practice is available on the Equality Commission’s website[1]

The screening template has four sections to complete. These are:

  • Section A  provides details about the policy or decision that is being screened
  • Section B gives information on the consultation process, supporting evidence gathered and has four key questions outlining the likely impacts on all equality groups
  • Section C has four key questions in relation to obligations under the Disability Discrimination Order  
  • Section D is the formal record of the screening decision

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Section A

Details about the policy or decision to be screened.

1. Title of policy or decision to be screened

City Centre Living Vision (CCLV)

2. Brief description of policy or decision to be screened

(Explain is this a new, revised or existing policy?  Are there financial, legislative or procurement implications?)

The Belfast Agenda set ambitious objectives to grow the population of the city by 66,000 people and sets short-term stretch goals for the provision of affordable housing.  As its spatial articulation, the draft Local Development Plan (LDP) seeks to provide for 31,000 additional homes by 2035, with an estimated 8,000 units anticipated in the city centre.

Housing has been highlighted as a key priority for the Community Planning Partnership, with linkages across a number of the Delivery Boards, in working with a range of both public and private sector delivery partners in order to promote and bring forward appropriate residential development. The Belfast Housing Land Availability Monitor records 3,433 residential units completed in Belfast from 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2020.

The Strategic Policy and Resources Committee, on 21 August 2020, considered a report from the Belfast Innovation and Inclusive Growth Commission, aimed at making the case for investment in jobs-led programmes, to drive an inclusive economic recovery. This report highlighted housebuilding as a critical lever for driving inclusive growth in cities and the significant requirement for new homes in Belfast, with the need for a thriving residential population in the city core being critical to the city’s economic resilience. It referenced the ambitious programme being progressed by the council to accelerate city centre living by using public sector land assets.

Given the challenges facing our city centre, the need to reimagine and inject new life into the city core is more critical now than ever. A thriving residential population will be integral to a reimagined city centre, brought forward from a place-making perspective, enhancing connectivity between the centre and surrounding communities and providing connected and welcoming spaces.

At their meeting on the 8 April 2020 City Growth and Regeneration Committee decided that a report should be brought back to committee in relation to city centre living and housing demand across all tenures together with models of delivery. The City Centre Waiting List recently brought forward by Northern Ireland Housing Executive (NIHE) provides evidence of social housing demand, and a recent report undertaken via DfC provides an evidence base around other city centre living accommodation including Build to Rent.  Detail of planning applications in the system also provides some degree of information regarding latent demand. 

The Strategic Policy and Resources Committee, at its meeting of 23 October 2020, approved a consultancy tender to include an analysis on city centre residential development that would provide analysis of the latent demand in terms of quantum and product requirement. Given the need to try and accelerate city centre living and understand the barriers and levers to do this, this work will also provide a City Centre Living Vision, building upon the information already in place.

This will provide an overarching vision for successful city centre living both for existing and future residents; an assessment of demand across all housing tenures; supporting infrastructure requirements; creating a quality environment for successful city centre living; and consideration of any barriers to development, including site specific in relation to identified sites in the council ownership and potential means of subvention. The detail of this work will be brought back to the committee as it progresses.  

3. Aims and objectives of the policy or decision to be screened
(What is the policy trying to achieve?)

The City Centre Living Vision is being produced to prepare a residential development Vision to sustainably increase Belfast’s city centre population by 8,000 units over the period 2014 to 2035.

This work should be informed by:

  • Demand and market analysis
  • International case studies and good practice
  • Assessment of potential development sites and development context/constraints
  • Work should take into account and build on existing research, policy and initiatives.

Approach

The approach is broken down in to five principle workstreams:

  1. Assessment of local policy, research, demographics, and community perceptions
  2. Market and demand review
  3. Review of international case studies and consultations with external investors
  4. Supply and constraints analysis
  5. Options generation and appraisal and strategy formulation

In terms of what we hope to ultimately receive is a piece of research that would include an analysis on city centre residential development that would provide analysis of the latent demand in terms of quantum and product requirement. Given the need to try and accelerate city centre living and understand the barriers and levers to do this, this work is to provide a City Centre Living Vision, building upon the information already in place across the council.

These are the specific objectives for the project:

  • Analysis of the market demand.
  • Understand the barriers and levers to push forward the council’s city centre housing ambition.
  • What council intervention can be undertaken to act as enablers to housing led regeneration?
  • What does a successful city centre living experience look like for both existing, adjacent, and future residents?

This work will provide an overarching strategic vision for successful city centre living both for existing and future residents; an assessment of demand across all housing tenures; supporting infrastructure requirements; creating a quality environment for successful city centre living; and consideration of any barriers to development, including site specific in relation to identified sites in council ownership and potential means of subvention.

Workstreams for City Centre Living Vision

Workstream 1
Context and markets
(Establishes existing policy, research initiatives and characteristics of city centre)
Workstream 2
Market and demand review
(This historic review of demand, supply and constraints informs options within Workstream 5)
Workstream 3
Case studies and good practice
(lessons learnt from developers and funders on successful schemes)
Workstream 4
Supply and constraints analysis
(Assess availability and capacity of sites in Belfast)
Workstream 5
Options formulation, appraisal and strategy (Draw up a programme of actions to achieve BCC's housing growth targets)
  • Policy review
  • Public sector funding review
  • Socio-economic and demographic review
  • Review of up to five existing city centre communities
  • Existing and potential future markets
  • Historic sales, development rates and demand
  • Future demand drivers
  • Demand scenarios in junction with Local Development Plan
  • Consultation (up to seven developers and investors)
  • Case studies and potential approach for Belfast
  • Review of sites and opportunities
  • Social and physical infrastructure requirements
  • Perceived barriers to delivery
  • Potential constraints and how to off-set these
  • SWOT analysis
  • Option generation
  • Identify investors by funding, returns and acceptable risk
  • Identify suppliers for cluster sites
  • Investor demand
  • Supply and demand comparison

These are specific objectives for the project:

  • Analysis of the market demand.
  • Understand the barriers and levers to push forward the council’s city centre housing ambition.
  • What council intervention can be undertaken to act as enablers to housing led regeneration?
  • What does a successful city centre living experience look like for both existing, adjacent, and future residents?
  • Supporting infrastructure requirements to support this city centre ambition?
  • Socio-economic benefits that accompany and support city centre living.
  • Site specific analysis in relation to identified sites in council ownership (Smithfield, Corporation Street, Exchange Street, Gloucester Street and Ormeau Avenue) and potential means of subvention.

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4. Who will the policy or decision impact?

Consider the internal and external impacts (both actual or potential) and explain.

People Actual or potential impact
Staff
Belfast City Council’s City Regeneration and Development Division are working in Partnership with DfC and NIHE to co- deliver the strategic identification of housing led regeneration opportunities across the city. This Vision will develop further workstreams with staff working with colleagues in Place and Economy Department and cross council Departments to deliver elements.
Yes
Service users
It is envisaged that the Vision will impact on residents (existing and new), businesses, shoppers and persons using the transport network and streets.
Yes 
Other public sector organisations
DfC will be working closely with the council on the outputs from this vision. Others that will be involved include: Transport NI, DfI, Housing Executive and NIW and other stakeholders with a vested interest in the provision of city centre living.
Yes
Voluntary, community groups and trade unions
Residents associations for citizens living in and adjacent to the city centre.
Yes
Others, please specify
People who live in, work in, study, invest in or visit the city.
Yes

5. Are there linkages to other agencies or departments?

The City Centre Living Vision contains several elements to develop a vibrant and prosperous city centre that people will want to live and developers will want to develop in. This will require close collaborative working and partnership delivery across several agencies and organisations from across the public, private and community sectors, with the appropriate agency/department taking the lead. Key agencies include:

  • Government and other public bodies
    • Departments for Communities, Infrastructure and Finance
    • Translink
    • Belfast City Centre Management
    • Belfast ONE BID
    • Linen Quarter BID
    • Cathedral Quarter BID
    • Invest NI
    • Policing and Community Safety Partnership
    • Northern Ireland Housing Executive
  • Institutions
    • University of Ulster
    • Queen's University
    • Belfast Metropolitan College
    • Belfast Health and Social Care Trust
    • Institute of Place Management.
  • Area and community
    • Neighbourhood and Area Partnership representing local communities
    • Young people, older people, students
  • Others
    • Commercial agents
    • City centre businesses
    • Trade unions
    • Key developers
    • Belfast Chamber of Trade and Commerce
    • Housing associations

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Section B

Information on the consultation process, supporting evidence gathered and has 4 key questions outlining the likely impacts for equality and good relations.

Belfast City Council approved the appointment of consultancy firm Savills to develop the City Centre Living Vision for the city. The consultation team will undertake meetings and workshops with a number of city centre residents and Groups such as disabled interest groups, as well as consult with city stakeholders between August and October 2021 to understand from existing and future residents as to what their actual/perceived city centre experience look like. What is keeping residents residing in the city, what works well and what could be improved to help retain existing residents remaining within the city and what could entice new residents to purchase/rent in the city. it will look at existing communities to try to understand from residents what works well and what doesn’t within the city and how the council can progress a significant programme of city centre housing without disenfranchising these important communities, it will also look at the reasons why, when there are a diverse range of housing led planning approvals within the city boundary, these are not being progressed and what will entice investors and developers to take a Belfast first approach when looking for investment opportunities.

6. Outline consultation process planned or achieved

Belfast City Council approved the appointment of consultancy firm Savills to develop the City Centre Living Vision for the city. The consultation team will undertake meetings and workshops with a number of city centre residents and Groups such as disabled interest groups, as well as consult with city stakeholders between August and October 2021 to understand from existing and future residents as to what their actual/perceived city centre experience look like. What is keeping residents residing in the city, what works well and what could be improved to help retain existing residents remaining within the city and what could entice new residents to purchase/rent in the city. it will look at existing communities to try understand from residents what works well and what doesn’t within the city and how the council can progress a significant programme of city centre housing without disenfranchising these important communities, it will also look at the reasons why, when there are a diverse range of housing led planning approvals within the city boundary, these are not being progressed and what will entice Investors and Developers to take a Belfast first approach when looking for investment opportunities.

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7. Available evidence

What evidence or information (both qualitative and quantitative) have you gathered to inform this policy?  Set out all evidence to help inform your screening assessment. It is important to record information gathered from a variety of sources such as: monitoring information; complaints; research surveys; consultation exercises from other public authorities.

Policy context
Regional

The NI Programme for Government (draft), NI Industrial Strategy (draft), the UK Industrial Strategy and the emerging Industrial Programme being developed by the Belfast Regional City Deal (BRCD) partners provide clear Policy Frameworks that promote investment and innovation in the growing knowledge economy and tourism sector.

The Regional Development Strategy 2035 (RDS) is the Spatial Strategy for the Northern Ireland Executive and provides an overarching Planning Framework to facilitate and guide development. The RDS provides strategic guidance through Regional Guidance (RG) and Spatial Framework Guidance (SFG) under the three sustainable development themes of the Economy, Society and Environment.

The Spatial Framework Guidance 3 (SPG) specifically recognises the need to enhance the distinctive role of Belfast City Centre as the primary retail location in Northern Ireland. In relation to future major retail development proposals, it promotes a precautionary approach to out-of-town shopping development, given the likely adverse impact on the city centre area. The Strategic Planning Policy Statement (SPPS) advocates a town centre approach for the location and future of retailing and other main town centre uses. This policy aims to encourage better decision-making through supporting and sustaining vibrant centres through Local Development Plans (LDPs).

Strategic Planning Policy Statement (SPPS)

A final Equality Screening report was published alongside the SPPS in September 2015. As the high-level Strategic Planning Policy Statement for NI, there are no specific policies within the SPPS that directly infringe upon the Framework. However, the screening report notes that the SPPS, and the planning system generally, “is for securing the orderly and consistent development of land across Northern Ireland under a two-tier planning system”. It concludes that “it will be uniformly applied across all Section 75 categories without prejudice” and, as such, “will not positively or negatively discriminate towards” and Section 75 groups. It is, in fact, expected to equally benefit all Section 75 groups”.

Emerging Local Development Plan

The Plan Strategy (draft) was launched at the end of August 2018. ‘Creating a Vibrant Economy’ is one of the primary aims of the plan to strengthen Belfast as the Regional economic driver. It recognises that for our city centre to remain successful, it needs to be the focus for major new investment and retail development. It will encourage a mix of different shops and services and decide where these should be located. The retail policies within the LDP will seek to address current and future retailing needs over the plan period. It will therefore aim to:

  • Provide a range of uses appropriate to the role and function of a city centre which can realise ambitions for growth.
  • Acknowledge the distinctive role of Belfast City Centre as the primary location for retailing in the region.
  • Adopt a sequential approach to the identification of retail and other town centre uses decision-making.
  • Maintain and improve accessibility to and within the city centre by supporting connectivity.
  • Support local economies by ensuring continued vibrancy and vitality.
  • Develop a compact urban form that maximises opportunities in the city centre.
  • Provide a focus for economic development.

Belfast Agenda

The vision for Belfast in 2035 set out in the Belfast Agenda is:

“Belfast will be a city re-imagined and resurgent. A great place to live and work for everyone. Beautiful, well connected and culturally vibrant, it will be a sustainable city shared and loved by all its citizens, free from the legacy of conflict. A compassionate city offering opportunities for everyone. A confident and successful city energising a dynamic and prosperous city region. A magnet for talent and business and admired around the world. A city people dream to visit.”

The Belfast Agenda has ambitious targets of:

  • 46,000 additional jobs
  • 66,000 additional residents
  • Attract over £1billion in private sector investment
  • Create 4,000 business start-ups
  • Grow the city’s rate base by five per cent through an increased number of residential and commercial developments
  • Increase the percentage of residents satisfied with the city living experience

City Centre Regeneration and Investment Strategy

The City Centre Regeneration and Investment Strategy outlines an exciting vision to develop a world-class city centre for the future.

A thriving city centre is vital to the prosperity of the whole city and the region.  Around two-thirds of all jobs in Belfast are located in and around the city centre, so everything that we do to enhance it will benefit the city as a whole.

The strategy sets out our collective ambition for the continued growth and regeneration of the city core and its surrounding areas to 2030.  It has been shaped by extensive engagement with stakeholders and contains a roadmap of policies to guide city centre decision-making and key projects that translate those policies into action. 

Core principles

We are determined that the regeneration of our city centre will drive not just economic growth but social benefits. The strategy therefore includes a commitment to ongoing engagement with local people to ensure that the social impact of regeneration is maximised.  

The strategy is based on eight core policies. It will aim to:

  • increase the employment population
  • increase the residential population
  • manage the retail offer
  • maximise the tourism opportunity
  • create a regional learning and innovation centre
  • create a green centre, accessible to cyclists and walkers
  • connect to the city around
  • enhance shared space and social impact

Implementation

Now that the strategy has been finalised, the focus will be on delivery to realise aspirations for the city centre by ensuring that the projects, policies and opportunities described are followed through and delivered.

This strategy sets out Belfast City Council’s ambition for continued growth and regeneration of the city core to 2030 and contains policies to guide decision-making and key projects to drive economic growth and deliver social benefits.

The principles of BCCRIS include increasing the employment and residential population, managing retail, maximising tourism, creating a learning and innovation centre and a green centre. City connectivity, shared space and social impact are also key values. BCCRIS also identifies five special action areas within the city centre which have been progressed through master plans implemented by the council.

BCCRIS provides a vision for increasing the residential population in Belfast City Centre by creating “A compelling, attractive and secure environment, with shopping, open space and other amenities is essential. The overall strategy to improve the public realm, food and entertainment offerings, connectivity and general “buzz” of the city centre is as important to increasing the residential population as ensuring there are appropriate sites for development”. Through its policy to ‘Increase the Residential Population’ the following opportunities are outlined:

  • Identify key residential sites and prepare market and development briefs, in discussion with landowners. If necessary, prepare financial models to underpin and support funding package applications.
  • The council will continue to develop a balanced approach to student housing in the city including consideration of planning policy and other mechanisms to ensure this type of development is located in suitable locations and the many associated benefits can be maximised.
  • Remedy any key deficiencies in the city centre living environment, through improvement of food shopping, day-care, open space and sense of security.
  • Identify well-supported, social housing opportunities along the major roads leading into the centre.

Emerging Local Development Plan

The draft Plan Strategy was launched at the end of August 2018. ‘Creating a Vibrant Economy’ is one of the primary aims of the plan to strengthen Belfast as the regional economic driver. It recognises that for our city centre to remain successful, it needs to be the focus for major new investment and retail development. It will encourage a mix of different shops and services and decide where these should be located. The retail policies within the LDP will seek to address current and future retailing needs over the plan period. It will therefore aim to:

  • Provide a range of uses appropriate to the role and function of a city centre which can realise ambitions for growth.
  • Acknowledge the distinctive role of Belfast City Centre as the primary location for retailing in the region.
  • Adopt a sequential approach to the identification of retail and other town centre uses decision-making.
  • Maintain and improve accessibility to and within the city centre by supporting connectivity.
  • Support local economies by ensuring continued vibrancy and vitality.
  • Develop a compact urban form that maximises opportunities in the city centre.
  • Provide a focus for economic development.

Retail and Leisure Capacity Study

The Retail and Leisure Capacity Study for Belfast has been prepared in order to inform the contents of the new Local Development Plan 2035 (LDP) for the City Council. The Study provides guidance on the capacity for new retail and leisure development in Belfast, as well as strategic and operational advice relating to the scale, nature and location of this development in the foreseeable future.

The health check of the city centre has yielded these main findings:

  • According to GOAD, the primary retail area in the city centre has a vacancy rate higher than the GB average, with 18% of units vacant in 2016 compared to 11% in GB. By and large, this level of vacancy has not changed since 2009.
  • The proportion of comparison goods shops in the primary retail area has fallen by 7% between 2009 and 2016. In contrast, the proportion of leisure service uses has increased by five per cent.
  • The presence of multiples in the city centre is increasing (55 per cent of comparison goods units in 2016 compared to 51 per cent in 2009).
  • Rental levels on the prime pitches in Belfast are stabilising in line with the trend in GB, while commercial yields on investment in parts of these pitches are exceeding those in several comparably sized cities (Manchester, Liverpool and Leeds).​
Section 75 category Details of evidence, information and engagement
Religious belief

On Census day 2011, 48.8 per cent of the population of Belfast identified as Catholic and 42.5 per cent identified as Protestant. Belfast had a slightly higher percentage of people identifying as “Other” or “None” religion than the NI average. The table shows religious belief percentages.

A study conducted by Queen’s University, 2010, identified Belfast city as a space where people could mingle and feel safe.  This study also recognised Belfast as having the potential to be an important area for social change in everyday life.

Political opinion

The results of the May 2019 Belfast City Council elections are shown in this table.

The city centre is a place where people from a variety of political backgrounds live, work, visit and study. This programme aims to create a more vibrant city centre to that will be attractive those who live, work and visit the city. 

Issues concerning shared space in the city centre are key to all political communities. 

Racial group

According to the 2011 Census, 96.7% of the population of Belfast are White. The main minority ethnic groups were Chinese, Indian and Mixed ethnic group. This table shows percentages for ethnic groups.

Migrant workers from the A2 and A8 European Union (EU) Accession countries (Bulgaria, Romania, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia) represented 1.9 per cent of population, with a further 0.7 per cent from other EU countries.

The Census also identified that 4.3 per cent of the Belfast population aged 3 and over did not have English as their main language, which was higher than the NI average of 3.1 per cent. In 2018, the Department for Education identified 3,510 “newcomer” pupils (a newcomer pupil is one who has enrolled in a school but who does not have the satisfactory language skills to participate fully in the school curriculum, and the wider environment, and does not have a language in common with the teacher, whether that is English or Irish) across NI. 

While the Census data is the most accurate dataset available on ethnic minorities in NI, in 2020 it is likely to be an underestimation of the ethnic minority population.

Age

Belfast has a lower percentage of young people (aged under 16 years old) 18.61 per cent than the average for Northern Ireland 20.95 per cent and a similar percentage of older people (over 65 years old) 14.55 per cent as the Northern Ireland average of 14.56 per cent. 

Belfast has a growing student population with a number of new purpose built student accommodation blocks in the city centre and the new Ulster University city centre campus that will see some 15,000 students use the facilities daily.

In 2014, Belfast was the first city in Northern Ireland to join the World Health Organisation’s Global Network of Age Friendly Cities.  An age-friendly city is one in which organisations work together to make sure the quality of life for people is enhanced as they age.  Belfast City Council is part of the Healthy Ageing Strategic Partnership (HSAP) working with older people to ensure that Belfast is changing to meet the needs and desires of older people.

People from a variety of ages live, work, study and visit the city centre. This programme aims to improve vibrancy and vitality of the city centre.

Marital status

On Census day 2011, a higher proportion of Belfast residents aged 16 and over were single, separated, divorced or widowed than the NI resident population. Twenty two per cent of people also lived alone, which was the highest rate across NI where the average was 16.8 per cent. There were three hundred and fifty three residents or 0.1 per cent in civil partnerships, almost a third of all such partnerships in NI at that time. This is likely to be higher in 2020. This table shows percentages for marital status.

Sexual orientation

Based on an estimate of national and international research by The Rainbow Project, one in ten people in Northern Ireland would not identify as being heterosexual.

Men and women generally

According to NISRA 2018 mid-year population estimates, the population of Belfast by gender is broadly even, although there is a higher proportion of older females (59.3 per cent of the over 65 population are female). This table shows age population estimates for gender and ages.

Disability

The 2011 Census asked people to what extent a long-term health problem or disability (that is, which has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months) limits their day-to-day activities. At 25.9 per cent, Belfast has a higher proportion of people with a limiting health condition or disability than the general NI population (20.7 per cent). This table shows percentages of population with and without a disability or long-term health condition.

Dependants

The 2011 Census defines a “dependent child” is defined as a person aged under 16 or young person aged 16 to 18 who is a full-time student and living in a family with a parent or grandparent.

The 2011 Census showed that 28.6 per cent of households in Belfast included a dependent child compared to 33.9 per cent of households across NI. Historical Census data shows that the proportion of households with dependent children in both NI and Belfast has been in decline since 1981.

The Belfast City Council 2014 Residents' Survey reported that 32.3 per cent of the population have dependents or caring responsibilities. In Belfast in 2018, 15,550 people or 4.5 per cent of the population claimed Carer’s Allowance. (Carer’s Allowance is a non-contributory benefit for people who look after a severely disabled person for at least 35 hours a week.) This was higher than the NI average of 3.9 per cent. Most claimants were female: 62.9 per cent compared to 37.9 per cent male.

Table of religious belief percentages recorded on Census day in 2011.

Religion or religion brought up in: Catholic  Religion or religion brought up in: Protestant Religion or religion brought up in: Other religions Religion or religion brought up in: None
Belfast Northern Ireland Belfast Northern Ireland Belfast Northern Ireland Belfast  Northern Ireland
48.8 % 45.1 % 42.5 % 48.4 % 1.6 % 0.9 % 7.1 % 5.6 %

Table with Belfast City Council election results in 2019.

Party Total elected candidates
Sinn Féin 18
Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) 15
Alliance Party 10
Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) 6
Green Party Northern Ireland 4
People Before Profit Alliance 3
Progressive Unionist Party of Northern Ireland 2
Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) 2

Table with percentages of racial groups in Belfast and Northern Ireland recorded on Census Day in 2011.

Racial group Belfast  Northern Ireland
White 96.7% 98.2%
Irish Traveller 0.1% 0.1%
Mixed 0.5% 0.3%
Indian 0.7% 0.3%
Pakistani 0.1% 0.1%
Bangladeshi 0.1% 0.03%
Other Asian 0.6% 0.3%
Black Caribbean 0.03% 0.1%
Black African 0.3% 0.1%
Other Black 0.1% 0.1%
Chinese 0.7% 0.4%
Other ethnic group 0.2% 0.1%

Table with marital status percentages recorded for residents in Belfast and Northern Ireland on Census Day in 2011.

Marital status Belfast Northern Ireland
Single 45.3% 36.1%
Married 35.6% 47.6%
Civil partnership 0.13% 0.09%
Separated 5.4% 4.0%
Divorced or civil partnership dissolved 6.2% 5.5%
Widowed or surviving civil partner 7.5% 6.8%

Table population estimates of men and women in 2018 based on NISRA information.

All ages under one-year-old and 15 years old 16 to 39 years old 40 to 64 years old 65 years old and over
Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female
48.5% 51.5% 10.2% 9.7% 17.1% 18.1% 14.3% 15.3% 6.3% 8.4%

Table with percentages of people in Belfast and Northern Ireland with a disability or long-term health condition on Census Day in 2011.

Day-to-day activities limited a lot Day-to-day activities limited a little Day-to-day activities not limited
Belfast population NI population Belfast population NI population Belfast population NI population
11.4% 11.9% 11.5% 8.8% 76.5% 79.3%

8. What is the likely impact (indicate if the policy impact is positive or negative) on equality of opportunity for those affected by this policy, for each of the Section 75 equality categories? What is the level of impact?

Section 75 category If 'yes', provide details If 'no', provide reasons
Religious belief

The CCLV aims to provide a framework for the regeneration of housing within the city centre.  It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast.

There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group.
Minor
Political opinion 

The CCLV aims to provide a framework for the regeneration of housing within the city centre.  It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast.

There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group.

Minor
Racial group 

The CCLV aims to provide a framework for the regeneration of housing within the city centre.  It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast.

There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group.

Minor

Age

The CCLV aims to provide a framework for the regeneration of housing within the city centre.  It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast.

There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group.

Minor
Marital status

The CCLV aims to provide a framework for the regeneration of housing within the city centre.  It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast.

There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group.

Minor
Sexual orientation

The CCLV aims to provide a framework for the regeneration of housing within the city centre.  It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast.

There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group.
Minor
Men and women generally 

The CCLV aims to provide a framework for the regeneration of housing within the city centre. It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast.

There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group.
Minor
Disability

The CCLV aims to provide a framework for the regeneration of housing within the city centre.  It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast.

There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group.

Minor

 Dependants

The CCLV aims to provide a framework for the regeneration of housing within the city centre.  It will develop and transform the city centre into an economically dynamic and attractive shared space for everyone in Belfast.

There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group.
Minor

9.  Are there opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity for people within the Section 75 equalities categories?

Section 75 category If 'yes', provide details If 'no', provide reasons
Religious belief

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

Not applicable

Political opinion 

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in the programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

Not applicable

Racial group 

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in the programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

Not applicable

Age

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in the programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

Not applicable

Marital status

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in the programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

Not applicable

Sexual orientation

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in the programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

Not applicable

Men and women generally 

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in the programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

Not applicable

Disability

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in the programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

Not applicable

 Dependants

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in the programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

Not applicable


10. To what extent is the policy likely to impact (positive or negatively) on good relations between people of different religious belief, political opinion or racial group? What is the level of impact? 

Good relations category Likely impact Level of impact
Religious belief

It is our belief based on evidence that there would likely be a minor positive impact on people of different religious beliefs in that the proposed actions will provide opportunity for the promotion of a shared, welcoming and vibrant city centre.

Minor
Political opinion  It is our belief based on evidence that there would likely be a minor positive impact on people of different political opinion in that the proposed actions will provide opportunity for the promotion of a shared, welcoming and vibrant city centre. Minor
Racial group It is our belief based on evidence that there would likely be a minor positive impact on people of different racial group in that the proposed actions will provide opportunity for the promotion of a shared, welcoming and vibrant city centre. Minor

11.  Are there opportunities to better promote good relations between people of different religious belief, political opinion or racial group?  

Good relations category If 'yes', provide details If 'no', provide details
Religious belief

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in the programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

This is not applicable
Political opinion 

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in the programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

This is not applicable
Racial group 

The CCLV will focus on improving the quality of life in the city centre. It should be noted that any significant projects in the programme will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right by the lead delivery organisation and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

This is not applicable



Section C

Belfast City Council also has legislative obligations to meet under the Disability Discrimination Order. Questions 12 and 13 relate to these areas.

Consideration of Disability Duties

12. Does this proposed policy or decision provide an opportunity for the council to better promote positive attitudes towards disabled people?

Explain your assessment in full

The CCLV will have no direct impact on disabled people.  Each project delivering on objectives of this programme will address these issues separately.


13. Does this proposed policy or decision provide an opportunity to actively increase the participation by disabled people in public life?

Explain your assessment in full

The CCLV will have no direct impact on disabled people.  Each project delivering on objectives of this programme will address these issues separately.


14. Multiple identities

Provide details of data on the impact of the policy with multiple identities

Not known at this stage.


15. Monitoring arrangements

Section 75 places a requirement the council to have equality monitoring arrangements in place:

  • to assess the impact of policies and services
  • to help identify barriers to fair participation
  • to better promote equality of opportunity
Outline what data you will collect in the future to monitor the impact of this policy or decision on equality, good relations and disability duties.
Equality Good Relations Disability Duties

Each significant project will address these duties separately and will monitor.

Each significant project will address these duties separately and will monitor. Each significant project will address these duties separately and will monitor.

Section D

Formal record of screening decision

Title of proposed policy or decision being screened

City Centre Living Vision

I can confirm that the proposed policy or decision has been screened for:

  • equality of opportunity and good relations
  • disability duties
On the basis of the answers to the screening questions, I recommend that this policy or decision is
Screened in 
It is necessary to conduct an equality impact assessment
Not applicable

Screened out: no EQIA is necessary (no impacts)
This is a study of the potential growth in city centre living.  Any significant projects that come out of this study will be screened in their own right by the lead delivery organisation.

Applicable

 

Provide a brief note to explain how this decision was reached.

There is no adverse impact on any Section 75 group

Screened out
Mitigating actions (minor impacts)

  • Provide a brief note to explain how this decision was reached
  • Explain what mitigating actions or policy changes will now be introduced.

Screening assessment completed by

Name:     Paula Conway

Date: 29 October 2021

Department : Place and Economy


Screening decision approved by

Name: Adrian Ferguson

Date: 2 November 2021

Department:   Place and Economy

Please save the Word final version of the completed screening form and email to the Equality and Diversity Officer: equality@belfastcity.gov.uk  A link to this screening form will be provided to the council's Section 75 consultees.

For more information about equality screening, contact:

Lorraine Dennis or Lisa McKee
Equality and Diversity Unit
Belfast City Council
Belfast City Hall
Belfast
BT1 5GS
Telephone:  028 9027 0511
Email: equality@belfastcity.gov.uk

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Footnotes

[1] Equality Commission for Northern Ireland (link opens in new window)
[2] Conflict in Cities and the Contested States (this PDF opens in new window)

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