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Equality and diversity

Equality screening outcome report: Dual language street signs policy

Published in May 2022


Contents


Overview of screening template

The council has a statutory duty to screen. This includes our strategies, plans, policies, legislative developments; and new ways of working such as the introduction, change or end of an existing service, grant funding arrangement or facility. This screening template is designed to help departments consider the likely equality impacts of their proposed decisions on different groups of customers, service users, staff and visitors.    

Before carrying out an equality screening exercise it is important that you have received the necessary training first. To find out about the training needed or any other queries on screening, contact the Equality and Diversity Officer Lorraine Dennis on extension 6027 or or Lisa McKee on extension 6310 by email equality@belfastcity.gov.uk

The accompanying screening guidance note provides straightforward advice on how to carry out equality screening exercises. Detailed information about the Section 75 equality duties and what they mean in practice is available on the Equality Commission’s website [1].

The screening template has four sections to complete. These are:

  • Section A  provides details about the policy or decision that is being screened
  • Section B gives information on the consultation process, supporting evidence gathered and has four key questions outlining the likely impacts on all equality groups
  • Section C has four key questions in relation to obligations under the Disability Discrimination Order  
  • Section D is the formal record of the screening decision

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Section A

Details about the policy or decision to be screened.

1. Title of policy or decision to be screened

Dual Language Street Signs Policy

2. Brief description of policy or decision to be screened

(Explain is this a new, revised or existing policy?  Are there financial, legislative or procurement implications?)  

Explain - Is this a new, revised or existing policy?  Are there financial / legislative / procurement implications?)

This is a revision of an existing policy, formerly known as Street Naming and Buildings Numbering Policy.

The statutory basis for this function is contained within Article 11 of the Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Northern Ireland) Order 1995. This order commenced on 15 March 1995, it provides for street naming, street numbering and the provision of street signs. It also gives Councils the discretionary power to erect dual language street signs or secondary nameplates in a language other than English.

To facilitate this statutory obligation, Belfast City Council first agreed a Dual Language Street Sign Policy in 1995, however implementation was deferred to enable the resource implications to be agreed. In 1998, the council agreed to implement the policy, which provides that only applications supported by a petition of one third of residents of the street will trigger a formal consultation of residents on the street. If two-thirds of the residents of the street respond positively to the consultation, the threshold is deemed to be met for the erection of a second language street sign.

Subsequently, in February 2009, the council adopted a Street Naming and Buildings Numbering Policy, which incorporates the Dual Language Street Signs Policy.  Following consideration of a Notice of Motion initially proposed in February 2020, the Strategic Policy and Resources (SP&R) committee agreed to review the policy in October 2020, and to incorporate other revisions that could be made to the current policy to address issues that have arisen since it was first adopted.  On 7 January 2022, the council ratified the decision taken by SP&R to adopt a new policy position in relation to Dual Language Street Signs.  


3. Aims and objectives of the policy or decision to be screened
(What is the policy trying to achieve?)

This policy aims to:

  • Support the council in deciding whether and how to exercise its discretion to erect a street name in a language other than English
  • Have regard to any views on the matters expressed by the occupiers of premises in that street
  • Define the supporting procedures and key definitions to promote consistent implementation of the policy in line with the available resources
  • Provide clarification on the aims or reasons for new revision and how it differs from existing policy

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4. Who will the policy or decision impact?

Consider the internal and external impacts (both actual or potential) and explain.

People Actual or potential impact
Staff
All staff including those implementing the policy and working in the areas the policy is implemented
Yes
Service users
Occupiers, visitors and users of the streets in the city  
Yes 
Other public sector organisations
Statutory consultees, Government departments, representative groups and community associations
Yes
Voluntary, community groups and trade unions
All users of, and people with an interest in the Dual Language Street Signs Policy  
Yes
Others, please specify
General public. All users of and people with an interest in the Dual Language Street Signs Policy      
Yes

5. Are there linkages to other agencies or departments?

Belfast City Council departments including:

  • Place and Economy
  • City and Neighbourhood Services
  • Legal and Civic Services Department and
  • Physical Programmes

British and Irish Governments via the New Decade, New Approach deal (January 2020)

The Northern Ireland Executive including a number of individual departments such as Department for Communities and Department for Infrastructure. 

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Section B

Information on the consultation process, supporting evidence gathered and has four key questions outlining the likely impacts for equality and good relations.

6. Outline consultation process planned or achieved

Background process

Since the Notice of Motion in February 2020, informal pre-consultation engagement has taken place with the indigenous language community groups namely Foras na Gaeilge, Conradh na Gaeilge and the Ulster Scots Agency who provided feedback on the draft policy.

Planned consultation

A paper was presented to the Strategic Policy and Resources Committee meeting on 23 April 2021, which stated:

 A public consultation document is being prepared and will be published on the Engagement HQ platform. The consultation will run for a period of 12 to 14 weeks and will include a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods of assessing public opinion to ensure widespread and meaningful engagement including two remote public meetings. Informal preconsultation engagement has taken place with the indigenous language community groups namely Foras na Gaeilge, Conradh na Gaeilge and the Ulster Scots Agency. This consultation document will be sent to the other relevant language community groups in Belfast for their feedback. Advice will be sought from Marketing and Communications for communications support due to the high level of interest when this decision was made at the committee.

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7. Available evidence

What evidence or information (both qualitative and quantitative) have you gathered to inform this policy?  Set out all evidence to help inform your screening assessment. It is important to record information gathered from a variety of sources such as: monitoring information; complaints; research surveys; consultation exercises from other public authorities.

Background information and links to other policies

  • Section 75 of the Northern Ireland Act (1998) requires public authorities to have due regard to the need to promote equality of opportunity across the nine identified groups and to have regard to the desirability of promoting good relations between people of different religious belief, political opinion or racial group. These obligations are designed to make sure that equality and good relations considerations are carefully considered as part of the policy development process.
  • The Good Friday Agreement (1998), in relation to the Irish language, includes a commitment to “take resolute action to promote the language” and to “facilitate and encourage the use of the language in speech and writing in public and private life where there is appropriate demand.”
  • The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (2001) as the Council of Europe's commitment to the protection of national minorities, is designed to protect and promote regional and minority languages. It places emphasis on the cultural dimension of the language in all aspects of the life of its speakers. In Northern Ireland, this relates to Irish and Ulster Scots.
  • St Andrew's Agreement (2006) committed the UK Government to work with the incoming Northern Ireland Executive to protect and enhance the development of the Irish and Ulster-Scots languages. This places responsibility on the Executive to adopt a strategy setting out how it proposes to enhance and protect the development of the Irish language and Ulster-Scots culture, heritage and language.
  • Foras na Gaeilge (2015) published a guidance document in relation to the use of Irish in local councils. This includes a specific section with reference to the use of Irish in street naming or signage. 
  • United Nations Special Rapporteur Language Rights of Linguistic Minorities: A Practical Guide for Implementation (2017). The guide provides that, “Street and locality names and topographical indicators intended for the public are important as markers of social identity, culture and history”.  The sign can “demonstrate inclusiveness and that various population groups share a locality in harmony and mutual respect.”  The threshold for providing dual language signage tends to vary between five per cent and 20 per cent of the local population.  
  • The New Decade, New Approach (NDNA) published jointly in 2020 by the British and Irish governments, includes linguistic and cultural provision under ‘Rights, language and identity’ to celebrate and support all aspects of Northern Ireland’s rich cultural and linguistic heritage, recognising the equal validity and importance of all identities and traditions.  NDNA also outlines how an Irish Language strategy and an Ulster Scots Language Heritage and Culture Strategy will be developed.  A draft Irish Language Strategy and a draft Ulster Scots Language Heritage Strategy were both consulted on and published by the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure in 2015.
  • Belfast City Council adopted a Language Strategy 2018 to 2023.  The strategy aspires to create a place where linguistic diversity is celebrated and respected, and where those who live, work and visit Belfast can expect to access what Belfast has to offer, using forms of language with which they are familiar and comfortable.  The strategy work stands will address the needs and aspirations of various language communities:
    • Irish language
    • Ulster Scots language
    • sign languages
    • new communities’ languages, and
    • languages and communications for disabled people. 

The strategy includes a commitment to adopt the use of Irish and Ulster Scots in signs, and in particular, where 'it will be seen primarily by users of Irish and Ulster-Scots'.

  • Belfast City Council Good Relations Strategy (2019):  Through the Belfast Agenda, we have made a commitment to create and develop a shared, peaceful and reconciled city.  The Good Relations Strategy commits to creating shared spaces and aims to promote sharing over separation and the economic, social and environmental benefits of such.

Along with Belfast City Council, at least seven other local government districts in Northern Ireland have policies that make provision for dual language street signage.  These policies follow a similar process for application, consultation and decision-making with variations on the levels of support for and against each application process.

Section 75 category Details of evidence, information and engagement
Religious belief

 In 2015, the council boundary was extended as a result of local government reform and the census data from 2011 shows that 48.8 per cent of the usual residents identified as coming from a Catholic community background compared with 42.5 per cent who identified as coming from a Protestant or other Christian-related background.

The Continuous Household Survey 2013/2014 data showed that:

  • A higher proportion of both Protestants (22.4 per cent) and those with other or no religion (18.1 per cent) have knowledge of Ulster-Scots than Catholics (9.1 per cent).
  • A higher proportion of Catholics (30.4 per cent) have knowledge of Irish than both those with other or no religion (12.3 per cent) and Protestants (2.9 per cent).
  • Adults living in the most deprived areas are less likely to have knowledge of Ulster-Scots than those living in the least deprived areas (9.4 per cent and 18.7 per cent respectively). Similarly, a lower proportion of adults living in urban areas (13.2 per cent) have knowledge of Ulster-Scots than those living in rural areas (23.0 per cent).
  • The proportion of those who live in the least deprived areas of Northern Ireland who have knowledge of Irish increased from 7.8 per cent in 2011/2012 to 13.0 per cent in 2013/2014. Similarly, for those living in urban areas, the proportion who had some knowledge of Irish increased from 11.2 per cent in 2011/2012 to 14.6 per cent in 2013/2014. All other groups and areas saw no change in the proportion who had some knowledge of Irish when data from 2011/2012 and 2013/2014 are compared.
  • Adults living in rural area are more likely to have some knowledge of Ulster-Scots in 2013/14 compared with 2011/12 (19.8 per cent and 23.0 per cent, respectively). All other groups and areas saw no change in the proportion who had some knowledge of Ulster-Scots when data from 2011/2012 and 2013/2014 are compared.

In Northern Ireland, religion, political opinion and racial background have become interwoven, and polarised opinions and perceptions currently exist around the issue of dual language.

Political opinion

In the last local government election held on 2 May 2019, first preference votes were:

  • 28.2  per cent for Sinn Féin (SF)
  • 21.6 per cent for the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP)
  • 15.7 per cent for the Alliance Party
  • 9.1 per cent for the Social, Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP)
  • 6.2 per cent for the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP)
  • 6.0 per cent for the Green Party
  • 5.2 per cent for the People before Profit Alliance
  • 3.1 per cent for the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP).

Sixty councillors were elected to Belfast City Council. The results of the May 2019 Belfast City Council elections are shown in this table.
In Northern Ireland, religion, political opinion and racial background have become interwoven, and polarised opinions and perceptions currently exist around the issue of dual language.

Racial group

According to the 2011 Census, 96.7 per cent of the population of Belfast are White. The main minority ethnic groups were Chinese, Indian and Mixed ethnic group. This table shows percentages for ethnic groups.

Migrant workers from the A2 and A8 European Union (EU) Accession countries (Bulgaria, Romania, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia) represented 1.9 per cent of population, with a further 0.7 per cent from other EU countries.

The Census also identified that 4.3 per cent of the Belfast population aged three years old and over did not have English as their main language, which was higher than the NI average of 3.1 per cent. In 2018, the Department for Education identified 3,510 “newcomer” pupils (a newcomer pupil is one who has enrolled in a school but who does not have the satisfactory language skills to participate fully in the school curriculum, and the wider environment, and does not have a language in common with the teacher, whether that is English or Irish) across Norhtern Ireland.

The Census showed that the most commonly spoken languages in Belfast (excluding English and Irish) are Polish (1.22 per cent), Chinese (0.30 per cent), Tagalog/Filipino (0.24 per cent) and Slovak (0.17 per cent).

NISRA has published data on language use for Northern Ireland as a whole which shows that very high proportions of residents whose main language is Tagalog/ Filipino (99 per cent), Irish (98 per cent) or Malayalam (92 per cent) can speak English well or very well. However, the figures are much lower for those who speak mainly Chinese (61 per cent), Lithuanian (62 per cent), Slovak (64 per cent), Polish (66 per cent), Russian (66 per cent), Hungarian (68 per cent), Latvian (71 per cent or Portuguese (73 per cent).

In Northern Ireland, religion, political opinion and racial background have become interwoven, and polarised opinions and perceptions currently exist around the issue of dual language.

Age

According to NISRA 2018 mid-year population estimates, Belfast has a relatively young population with 55.7 per cent of the population aged under 40 compared to 51.6 per cent of the Northern Ireland population.

NISRA projects that by 2041, people under 40 will make up 51.3 per cent of the population, but that the 65 years old and over age bracket will be the fastest growing, comprising 72,245 people or 20.4 per cent of the Belfast population.

Marital status

On Census day 2011, a higher proportion of Belfast residents aged 16 and over were single, separated, divorced or widowed than the NI resident population. Twenty two per cent of people also lived alone, which was the highest rate across NI where the average was 16.8 per cent  Three hundred and fifty three residents or 0.1 per cemt were in civil partnerships, almost a third of all such partnerships in NI at that time. This is likely to be higher in 2021. This table shows percentages for marital status.

Sexual orientation

There are currently no or limited statistics that monitor the sexual orientation of the population in NI. The 2018 NI Life and Times found that:

  • 94 per cent of respondents identified as “heterosexual or ‘straight’ ”
  • one per cent as “’gay’ or ‘lesbian’ (homosexual)”;
  • one per cent as “bisexual”’ and
  • one per cent as “Other”
  • three per cent declined to answer

 A commonly used estimate of LGBTQ+ people in the UK, accepted by Stonewall UK, is five to seven per cent of the population.

Men and women generally

According to NISRA 2018 mid-year population estimates, the population of Belfast by gender is broadly even, although there is a higher proportion of older females (59.3 per cent of the over 65 population are female). This table shows population estimates for gender and ages.

Disability

The 2011 Census asked people to what extent a long-term health problem or disability (that is, which has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months) limits their day-to-day activities. At 25.9 per cent, Belfast has a higher proportion of people with a limiting health condition or disability than the general NI population (20.7 per cent). This table shows percentages of population with and without a disability or long-term health condition.

According to the 2011 Census, 18,261 (5.47 per cent) of Belfast residence population has a hearing loss.  There are approximately 3,500 BSL users and 1,500 ISL users living in Northern Ireland according to the Department for Communities (Sign Language Framework). Census 2011 does not provide statistics including Sign Language users living in Belfast.

On sight loss, the 2011 Census indicates this impacts 6,729 (2.02 per cent) of Belfast residence population.  A further 6,460 (1.93 per cent) of Belfast resident population has a communication difficulty.

Dependants

The 2011 Census defines a “dependent child” is defined as a person aged under 16 or young person aged 16 to 18 who is a full-time student and living in a family with a parent or grandparent.

The 2011 Census showed that 28.6 per cent of households in Belfast included a dependent child compared to 33.9 per cent of households across NI. Historical Census data shows that the proportion of households with dependent children in both NI and Belfast has been in decline since 1981.

The Belfast City Council 2014 Residents' Survey reported that 32.3 per cent of the population have dependents or caring responsibilities. In Belfast in 2018, 15,550 people or 4.5 per cent of the population claimed Carer’s Allowance. (Carer’s Allowance is a non-contributory benefit for people who look after a severely disabled person for at least 35 hours a week.) This was higher than the NI average of 3.9 per cent. Most claimants were female: 62.9 per cent compared to 37.9 per cent male.

Table of religious belief percentages recorded on Census day in 2011.

Religion or religion brought up in: Catholic  Religion or religion brought up in: Protestant Religion or religion brought up in: Other religions Religion or religion brought up in: None
Belfast Northern Ireland Belfast Northern Ireland Belfast Northern Ireland Belfast  Northern Ireland
48.8 % 45.1 % 42.5 % 48.4 % 1.6 % 0.9 % 7.1 % 5.6 %

Table with Belfast City Council election results in 2019.

Party Total elected candidates
Sinn Féin 18
Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) 15
Alliance Party 10
Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) 6
Green Party Northern Ireland 4
People Before Profit Alliance 3
Progressive Unionist Party of Northern Ireland 2
Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) 2

Table with percentages of racial groups in Belfast and Northern Ireland recorded on Census Day in 2011.

Racial group Belfast  Northern Ireland
White 96.7% 98.2%
Irish Traveller 0.1% 0.1%
Mixed 0.5% 0.3%
Indian 0.7% 0.3%
Pakistani 0.1% 0.1%
Bangladeshi 0.1% 0.03%
Other Asian 0.6% 0.3%
Black Carribean 0.03% 0.1%
Black African 0.3% 0.1%
Other Black 0.1% 0.1%
Chinese 0.7% 0.4%
Other ethnic group 0.2% 0.1%

Table with marital status percentages recorded for residents in Belfast and Northern Ireland on Census Day in 2011.

Marital status Belfast Northern Ireland
Single 45.3% 36.1%
Married 35.6% 47.6%
Civil partnership 0.13% 0.09%
Separated 5.4% 4.0%
Divorced or civil partnership dissolved 6.2% 5.5%
Widowed or surviving civil partner 7.5% 6.8%

Table with age and population estimates of men and women in 2018 based on NISRA information.

All ages under one year old and 15 years old 16 to 39 years old 40 to 64 years old 65 years old and over
Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female
48.5% 51.5% 10.2% 9.7% 17.1% 18.1% 14.3% 15.3% 6.3% 8.4%

Table with percentages of people in Belfast and Northern Ireland with a disability or long-term health condition on Census Day in 2011.

Day-to-day activities limited a lot Day-to-day activities limited a little Day-to-day activities not limited
Belfast population NI population Belfast population NI population Belfast population NI population
11.4% 11.9% 11.5% 8.8% 76.5% 79.3%

8. What is the likely impact (indicate if the policy impact is positive or negative) on equality of opportunity for those affected by this policy, for each of the Section 75 equality categories? What is the level of impact?

Section 75 category If 'yes', provide details If 'no', provide reasons
Religious belief

We do not know at this time how or in what ways dual language street signs will affect the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us to better understand how stakeholders may be affected by the policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Major
Political opinion 

We do not know at this time how or in what ways dual language street signs will affect the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us to better understand how stakeholders may be affected by the policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Major
Racial group 

We do not know at this time how or in what ways dual language street signs will affect the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us to better understand how stakeholders may be affected by the policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Major

Age

It is unlikely based on the evidence currently held that there will be a major adverse impact on this group.

Minor
Marital status

It is unlikely based on the evidence currently held that there will be a major adverse impact on this group.

Minor
Sexual orientation

It is unlikely based on the evidence currently held that there will be a major adverse impact on this group.

Minor
Men and women generally 

It is unlikely based on the evidence currently held that there will be a major adverse impact on this group.

Minor
Disability

It is unlikely based on the evidence currently held that there will be a major adverse impact on this group.

Minor

 Dependants

It is unlikely based on the evidence currently held that there will be a major adverse impact on this group.

Minor

9.  Are there opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity for people within the Section 75 equalities categories?

Section 75 category If 'yes', provide details If 'no', provide reasons
Religious belief

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Not applicable

Political opinion 

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Not applicable

Racial group 

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Not applicable

Age

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Not applicable

Marital status

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Not applicable

Sexual orientation

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Not applicable

Men and women generally 

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Not applicable

Disability

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Not applicable

 Dependants

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the equality of opportunity for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

Not applicable


10. To what extent is the policy likely to impact (positive or negatively) on good relations between people of different religious belief, political opinion or racial group? What is the level of impact? 

Good relations category Likely impact Level of impact
Religious belief

In Northern Ireland, religion, political opinion and racial background have become interwoven, and polarised opinions and perceptions currently exist around the issue of dual language.

We do not know at this time how or in what ways dual language street signs will affect the good relation between this group and others.  The consultation will help us to better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

The council’s Good Relations Strategy, adopted in 2019, is committed to creating shared spaces. Page 17 states: “This strategy aims to promote sharing over separation and the economic, social and environmental benefits of such. We need to continue to create spaces for communities to interact and make connections with each other, moving from parallel living to meaningful relationships and casual interactions”. Based on legal advice, each application will be subject to an equality, good relations and rural needs screening.

Information gathered during the screening process will be considered by the committee as part of its residual discretion. The exercise of the committee’s residual discretion will ensure that second language street signs will not be erected in a manner which could undermine Good Relations at a neighbourhood level.

Major impacts both positively and negatively
Political opinion 

In Northern Ireland, religion, political opinion and racial background have become interwoven, and polarised opinions and perceptions currently exist around the issue of dual language.

We do not know at this time how or in what ways dual language street signs will affect the good relations between this group and others. The consultation will help us to better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.
Major impacts both positively and negatively
Racial group

In Northern Ireland, religion, political opinion and racial background have become interwoven, and polarised opinions and perceptions currently exist around the issue of dual language.

We do not know at this time how or in what ways dual language street signs will affect the good relation between this group and others.  The consultation will help us to better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.
Major impacts both positively and negatively

11.  Are there opportunities to better promote good relations between people of different religious belief, political opinion or racial group?  

Good relations category If 'yes', provide details If 'no', provide details
Religious belief

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the good relations opportunities for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

This is not applicable
Political opinion 

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the good relations opportunities for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

This is not applicable
Racial group 

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will better promote the good relations opportunities for this group. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.

This is not applicable

Section C

Belfast City Council also has legislative obligations to meet under the Disability Discrimination Order. Questions 12 and 13 relate to these areas.

Consideration of Disability Duties

12. Does this proposed policy or decision provide an opportunity for the council to better promote positive attitudes towards disabled people?

Explain your assessment in full

This decision is likely to have no impact on those with or without disabilities and therefore it is unlikely to promote positive attitudes towards disabled people.


13. Does this proposed policy or decision provide an opportunity to actively increase the participation by disabled people in public life?

Explain your assessment in full

This decision is likely to have no impact on those with or without disabilities and it is therefore unlikely to increase participation by disabled people in public life.


14. Multiple identities

Provide details of data on the impact of the policy with multiple identities

We do not know at this time if dual language street signs will have an impact on multiple identities. The consultation will help us better understand how stakeholders may be affected by this policy, either positively or negatively, and the level of impact.


15. Monitoring arrangements

Section 75 places a requirement the council to have equality monitoring arrangements in place:

  • to assess the impact of policies and services
  • to help identify barriers to fair participation
  • to better promote equality of opportunity
Outline what data you will collect in the future to monitor the impact of this policy or decision on equality, good relations and disability duties.
Equality Good Relations Disability Duties

As this policy is subject to an EQIA, monitoring of the implementation of the policy will be carried out over two years.

As this policy is subject to an EQIA, monitoring of the implementation of the policy will be carried out over two years. As this policy is subject to an EQIA, monitoring of the implementation of the policy will be carried out over two years.

Section D

Formal record of screening decision

Title of proposed policy or decision being screened

Dual Language Street Signs Policy

I can confirm that the proposed policy or decision has been screened for:

  • equality of opportunity and good relations
  • disability duties
On the basis of the answers to the screening questions, I recommend that this policy or decision is
Screened in 
It is necessary to conduct an equality impact assessment
 Applicable

Screened out: no EQIA is necessary (no impacts)

Not applicable
Provide a brief note to explain how this decision was reached.

Screened out
Mitigating actions (minor impacts)

  • Provide a brief note to explain how this decision was reached
  • Explain what mitigating actions or policy changes will now be introduced.

Screening assessment completed by

Name:    

Date: 

Department : Place and Economy


Screening decision approved by

Name: 

Date:

Department:   Place and Economy

Please save the Word final version of the completed screening form and email to the Equality and Diversity Officer: equality@belfastcity.gov.uk  A link to this screening form will be provided to the council's Section 75 consultees.

For more information about equality screening, contact:

Lorraine Dennis or Lisa McKee
Equality and Diversity Unit
Belfast City Council
Belfast City Hall
Belfast
BT1 5GS
Telephone:  028 9027 0511
Email: equality@belfastcity.gov.uk

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Footnotes

[1] Equality Commission for Northern Ireland (link opens in new window)

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