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Equality and diversity

Equality screening outcome report: Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund Programme

Published in October 2021


Contents


Overview of screening template

The council has a statutory duty to screen. This includes our strategies, plans, policies, legislative developments; and new ways of working such as the introduction, change or end of an existing service, grant funding arrangement or facility. This screening template is designed to help departments consider the likely equality impacts of their proposed decisions on different groups of customers, service users, staff and visitors.    

Before carrying out an equality screening exercise it is important that you have received the necessary training first. To find out about the training needed or any other queries on screening, contact the Equality and Diversity Officer Lorraine Dennis on extension 6027 or Lisa McKee on extension 6310 or by email equality@belfastcity.gov.uk

The accompanying screening guidance note provides straightforward advice on how to carry out equality screening exercises. Detailed information about the Section 75 equality duties and what they mean in practice is available on the Equality Commission’s website [1];.

The screening template has four sections to complete. These are:

  • Section A  provides details about the policy or decision that is being screened
  • Section B gives information on the consultation process, supporting evidence gathered and has four key questions outlining the likely impacts on all equality groups
  • Section C has four key questions in relation to obligations under the Disability Discrimination Order  
  • Section D is the formal record of the screening decision

Section A

Details about the policy or decision to be screened

1. Title of policy or decision to be screened

Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund Programme

2. Brief description of policy or decision to be screened

(Explain if is this a new, revised or existing policy?  Are there financial, legislative or procurement implications?)

On 6 January 2020, the council ratified the Strategic Policy and Resources (SP&R) Committee decision on 17 December 2019 in setting up a £8m Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund (NRF). It was further agreed on 18 December 2020 that NRF programme would form an integral part of the council’s Recovery Framework document for the city in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  

3. Aims and objectives of the policy or decision to be screened
(What is the policy trying to achieve?)

The Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund (NRF) programme is an investment opportunity which aims to support capital regeneration projects and priorities across the city and the local community. The agreed NRF underpinning principles are based upon the prior similar programmes such as Local Investment Fund and Belfast Investment Fund. These underlying principles include:

  • Designed to support capital projects only
  • No ongoing revenue implications for the Council
  • Projects must be within the Belfast City Council area
  • Must be under the vires (the legal powers) of the council
  • The project proposer is not an individual, sole trader or profit-making organisation
  • Not on a council asset unless there is a long-term lease from the council to a third party in place
  • Will be an open call application process

The funding allocation model is based on percentage Population and percentage Multiple Deprivation Measure as agreed at SP&R Committee on 18 December 2020.

Area in Belfast Population summary Multiple Deprivation Measure (top 20% in Northern Ireland) Budget allocation
(£8million) 50/50 proportion
Population % £ amount % £ amount £ amount
North 63,807 19.1 £764,783 29.58 £1,183,200 £1,947,983
South 68,597 20.6 £822,195 17.94 £717,600 £1,539,795
East 98,249 29.4 £1,77,601 16.31 £652,400 £1,830,001
West 103,0373 30.9 £1,235,421 36.17 £1,446,800 £2,682,221
Total for areas 333,726 100 £4,000,000 100 £4,000,000 £8,000,000

For West, proportional allocation to Shankill (21.05 per cent of councillors) is £564,608, remainder West is £2,117, 613.

Given the ambition of members and to make sure that projects being delivered are substantial and transformational, the minimum threshold level for projects is set at £250k. The NRF programme should be focused on key thematic areas such as social enterprise, neighbourhood tourism and environmental, sustainable projects, and that these should reflect the priorities agreed with the City Recovery Framework.


4. Who will the policy or decision impact?

Consider the internal and external impacts (both actual or potential) and explain.

People Actual or potential impact
Staff Yes

All staff involved in the development and delivery of the Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund programme and projects, from design through to delivery and monitoring.

Service users Yes 

Those who access and uses any of the proposed community facilities and others as a result of NRF projects, whether as residents, tenants, landlords, consumers, service or facilities-providers, or users.

Other public sector organisations Yes
Ongoing engagement with central government agencies and bodies including DfC, DfI, Executive Office, Urban Villages and others through a collaborative approach to the project design and delivery.
Voluntary, community groups and trade unions Yes

The NRF programme has impact on the recipient community groups and other organisations that they have been working with. This will become more apparent as projects will come forward and the delivery of those projects progressed.

Others, please specify
 
Yes
The NRF programme is likely to involve a wide array of stakeholders as it continues to be developed. Those who will be affected by the programme and projects may include residents, community groups, visitors, customers of local facilities, businesses and tourists. 

5. Are there linkages to other agencies or departments?

The NRF programme aims to support the regeneration of neighbourhood areas across the city. This would entail collaborative working, partnerships delivery and networks with a number of agencies and organisations. The council is the lead partner and the main driver of the NRF programme. We will endeavour to link with our community partners as the respective projects develop. 

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Section B

Information on the consultation process, supporting evidence gathered and has four key questions outlining the likely impacts for equality and good relations

6. Outline consultation process planned or achieved

Background process

Based on the City Recovery Framework, Belfast is in the heart of recovery and renewal. Since March 2020, our priority in the initial stages of the pandemic has been to continue safe delivery of critical council services to our residents and businesses in the city. The Belfast: Our Recovery document sets out areas we need to focus on in the short term to drive city recovery during this pandemic phase, as well as building the foundations for sustained recovery.

In leading the Belfast Community Planning Partnership, we will continue to deliver The Belfast Agenda ambitions, our Corporate Plan and other city plans and strategies - albeit through the lens of these new challenges. To maximise the potential impact of our recovery plans, we will be seeking to harness many of the benefits from new strategic investments, emerging developments, and funding opportunities. This includes the delivery of the council’s new £8m Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund.

Public engagement

One of the NRF underlying principles is that there will be an open call application process. This means the legitimate community organisations, big or small, have the equal opportunity to apply for funding. There will be a comprehensive communication strategy to engage members of the public, elected representatives, partners, community groups and potential project recipients. The public engagement process will be open to all and be advertised through the appropriate council’s communication channels for example website and social media.

Given the significance of this programme and the capital projects that will be identified, assessed, and awarded with the appropriate NRF funding, it will be noted that each project would be subject to appropriate equality considerations and processes.

Area Working Groups' Debate

The respective Area Working Groups which comprised elected representatives from each district in the city will play an important role in the governance and delivery of the NRF programme.

The initial projects under NRF will be discussed and debated by elected members in line with the overall aims of the programme, the key thematic areas, and based on their knowledge and understanding of local needs.


7. Available evidence

What evidence or information (both qualitative and quantitative) have you gathered to inform this policy?  Set out all evidence to help inform your screening assessment.

It is important to record information gathered from a variety of sources such as:

  • monitoring information
  • complaints
  • research surveys
  • consultation exercises from other public authorities

Development of the Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund Programme

Belfast is the capital city of Northern Ireland and is acknowledged as the economic driver for the region. Overall investment in the city has the potential to grow the city’s attractiveness as a place to live in, work in, visit, study in or invest in.

Belfast strategies and policies

The Belfast Metropolitan Area Plan 2015 provides the land use context to planning for the wider city region and its adoption helps provide greater certainty. Whilst many of the policies remain valid, some parts of BMAP have naturally become outdated due to the length of time passed since inception.

Belfast City Council is currently developing the Local Development Plan (LDP) 2020-2035 for Belfast which will provide a 15-year plan framework to support economic and social needs in the city. The LDP will facilitate growth by coordinating public and private investment to encourage development where it can be of most benefit to the wellbeing of the community.

The Belfast Agenda is our city’s first community plan. The plan identifies how the council and its community planning partners will work collaboratively to deliver an ambitious and inclusive vision that will create a better quality of life for all the citizens in Belfast.

Our vision for Belfast 2035:

“Belfast will be a city re-imagined and resurgent. A great place to live and work for everyone. Beautiful, well connected and culturally vibrant, it will be a sustainable city shared and loved by all its citizens, free from the legacy of conflict. A compassionate city offering opportunities for everyone. A confident and successful city energising a dynamic and prosperous city region. A magnet for talent and business and admired around the world. A city people dream to visit.”

At a citywide level, the council has also produced or intended to produce a number of supporting strategic documents, aimed at addressing some of the broader economic, social and environmental outcomes that require attention such as the Cultural Strategy and the New 10-Year Tourism Plan, Resilience Strategy and Social Enterprise Action Plan. These are being developed with the city’s communities and other key stakeholders to identify priorities for Belfast and local areas.

Cultural Strategy 2020-2030

In August 2019, the ten-year 'Cultural Strategy, A City Imagining' was launched to help meet the Belfast Agenda vision for 2035, which imagines a culturally vibrant city. The strategy sets out four strategic themes shaped by the strategy’s engagement process: A City Belonging, A City Challenging, A City Creating and A City Exploring.

New Ten-Year Tourism Plan

The draft ten-year plan (aligned to the 'Cultural Strategy, A City Imagining', due for public consultation in October 2021) identified catalyst or accelerator projects and opportunities that could bolster investment in the sector to support recovery and growth. These catalysts include:

  • Catalyst Project 1: Our Place – support for local tourism
  • Catalyst Project 2: Make yourself At Home
  • Catalyst Project 3: Our Stories    

One of the four priorities (Catalyst Project 1) is to support tourism development across the city’s neighbourhoods. Adopting a place-based approach to the development of our neighbourhoods through local investment that supports product development, jobs creation and destination management. There are also opportunities to support capital development through the alignment with existing programmes including NRF. 

Resilience Strategy

Belfast launched its Resilience Strategy, the city’s first climate plan in December 2020. It sets out 30 transformational programmes to transition Belfast to an inclusive, zero-emissions, climate-resilient economy within a generation. The strategy comprises three elements:

  • Resilience Assessment – a review of how resilient we currently are and what the main threats are to the city
  • Ambitions Document – our resilience aspirations and a vision of what and where we want to be as a city
  • Delivery Plan – how we plan to achieve this

The Belfast Resilience Strategy is essentially a framework to safeguard Belfast against situations that could threaten its safety and stability over coming years and help us deliver our Belfast Agenda priorities. The Resilience Strategy is the first time that individuals and organisations across Belfast have worked together to identify the shocks and stresses which make Belfast more vulnerable, and which could threaten our economic, social, or environmental future. 

Social Enterprise Action Plan

Our Social Enterprise Action Plan 2019-2024 aims to grow Belfast's social economy sector to improve the lives of Belfast residents through inclusive growth. This plan was developed following various interviews with the sector and looks at addressing not just the needs of the sector, but also the barriers to growth to enhance the Belfast economy, create jobs for citizens and help to address social issues in the city.

Among other objectives, the plan aims to help create a social enterprising culture and increase levels of entrepreneurship in Belfast; to increase the number of social enterprises in Belfast by supporting at least 250 new start-ups in the city by 2023, to provide a platform for collaboration and partnership working within the sector as well as with the public and private sectors and others.

Section 75

Section 75 of the Northern Ireland Act (1998) requires public authorities to have due regard to the need to promote equality of opportunity:

  • between persons of different religious belief, political opinion, racial group, age, marital status or sexual orientation
  • between men and women generally
  • between persons with a disability and persons without
  • between persons with dependants and persons without

Public authorities are required to have regard to the desirability of promoting good relations between people of different religious belief, political opinion or racial group. These obligations are designed to ensure that equality and good relations considerations are carefully considered as part of the policy development process.

The council believed that the Belfast Agenda, Cultural Strategy, the New Ten-Year Tourism Plan, Resilience Strategy and the Social Enterprise Action Plan and in turn the delivery of the £8 million Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund Programme will not have specific adverse impacts for any Section 75 group. However, there are a number of key inequality issues which the delivery of the NRF programme may help to address.

It is possible that some of the projects under the NRF will have a differential impact on a number of the Section 75 groups. However, that impact is likely to be positive and address recognised need. The NRF has the potential to promote equality and good relations while addressing issues of exclusion and marginalisation.

In developing the NRF Programme, the council have ensured that these obligations are met to the fullest possible extent and that the promotion of equality of opportunity is at the core of the strategy and the programme. The NRF delivery will have an impact and will likely to benefit all Section 75 categories.

Also, it should be noted that any projects under NRF will require engagement with Section 75 groups and screening in their own right and will be driven by a strong focus on outcomes for local people.

Section 75 category Details of evidence, information and engagement
Religious belief

On March 2011, considering the Belfast resident population, the census data shows that 48.58 per cent belong to or were brought up in the Catholic religion and 42.30 per cent belong to or were brought up in a ‘Protestant and Other Christian (including Christian related)’ religion.[2]

Political opinion

In the last local government election (May 2019), 28.2 per cent of first preference votes were cast for Sinn Féin,  21.6 per cent for the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), 15.7 per cent for the Alliance Party, 9.1 per cent for the Social, Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), and 6.2 per cent for the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), 6.0 per cent for the Green Party, 5.2 per cent for the People Before Profit, and 3.1 per cent for the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP). 

Racial group

The 2011 census indicates that 96.43 per cent of Belfast’s population were white (including Irish Traveller) and 3.57 per cent were from an ethnic minority population. Belfast is becoming a more culturally diverse city. It is recognised that minority ethnic people may have more difficulties accessing public services, particularly if English is not their first language. Considering the population aged 3 years old and over: 13.65 per cent had some knowledge of Irish; 5.26 per cent had some knowledge of Ulster-Scots; and 4.78 per cent did not have English as their first language.[3]

Age

On Census Day March 2011, in Belfast City region 18.61 per cent were aged under 16 years and 14.55 per cent were aged 65 and over; The working age population (aged 16-64 years) make up two-thirds (66.84 per cent) of all Belfast residents;  Older people (aged 85+) account for 2.0 per cent of the Belfast population. Thirty-five years was the average (median) age of the population.[4]

Marital status

A relatively high percentage of Belfast residents are single at 45.3 per cent compared with the NI average of 36.1 per cent.  There is also a higher percentage of widowed people at 9.3 per cent compared with the NI average of 7.8 per cent.  Conversely, there are fewer married people at 35.6 per cent compared with the NI average of 47.6 per cent.

Sexual orientation

Several UK and NI-based studies have attempted to quantify the number of people who identify as LGB. Estimates for LGBT population range from 0.3 to 10 per cent using different sources.[5] According to ONS, the proportion of the UK population aged 16 years and over identifying as heterosexual or straight decreased from 95.3 per cent in 2014 to 94.6 per cent in 2018; the proportion identifying as lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB) increased from 1.6 per cent in 2014 to 2.2 per cent in 2018. In 2018, there were an estimated 1.2 million people aged 16 years and over identifying as LGB.[6]

Men and women generally

The 2011 census indicates that 48.08 per cent of the usually resident population of Belfast were male and 51.92 per cent were female.

Disability

The 2011 census indicates that 23.75 per cent of people in Belfast had a long-term health problem or disability that limited their day-to-day activities; 75.87 per cent of people stated their general health was either good or very good; and 12.05 per cent of people stated that they provided unpaid care to family, friends, neighbours or others.

Dependants

The Belfast City Council Residents' Survey 2014 reported that 32.3 per cent of the population have dependants or caring responsibilities. The 2011 Census shows that 11.58 per cent were lone parent households with dependent children.[7]


8. What is the likely impact (indicate if the policy impact is positive or negative) on equality of opportunity for those affected by this policy, for each of the Section 75 equality categories? What is the level of impact?

The council has established the £8million Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund support the priorities agreed with the City Recovery Framework such as social enterprise, neighbourhood tourism and environmental, sustainable projects. The values underpinning the NRF are consistent to the principles of:

(i) Good Relations and Equality
(ii) Balanced investment
(iii) Partnership and Integration
(iv) Value for Money 
(v) Sustainability

In addition, the delivery of Belfast Agenda – the city’s first community plan, the council strategies and in turn through the delivery of NRF is likely to have a positive impact on all Section 75 groups, both directly and indirectly by contributing to the economic, social and environmental regeneration and wellbeing of the city

Section 75 category Details of impact Level of impact
Religious belief We do not believe that the delivery of the Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund programme or projects will impact on the equality of opportunity by this group. The principles underpinning the fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment.  Recommendations on which projects are funded will go through the rigorous open call process, due diligence, appropriate governance arrangements, and agreed by the council’s Strategic Policy and Resources Committee. None
Political opinion 

The NRF supports the priorities agreed with the City Recovery Framework. The principles underpinning the Fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment.  Recommendations on which projects are funded will go through the rigorous open call process, due diligence, appropriate governance arrangements, and agreed by the council’s Strategic Policy and Resources Committee.

There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group.
Minor
Racial group 

We do not believe that the delivery of the Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund programme or projects will impact on the equality of opportunity by this group. The principles underpinning the fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment.  Recommendations on which projects are funded will go through the rigorous open call process, due diligence, appropriate governance arrangements, and agreed by the council’s Strategic Policy and Resources Committee.  

None

Age

We do not believe that the delivery of the Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund programme or projects will impact on the equality of opportunity by this group. The principles underpinning the Fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment.  Recommendations on which projects are funded will go through the rigorous open call process, due diligence, appropriate governance arrangements, and agreed by the council’s Strategic Policy and Resources Committee.  

None
Marital status

We do not believe that the delivery of the Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund programme/ projects will impact on the equality of opportunity by this group. The principles underpinning the fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment.  

None
Sexual orientation We do not believe that the delivery of the Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund programme or projects will impact on the equality of opportunity by this group. The principles underpinning the fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment.  Recommendations on which projects are funded will go through the rigorous open call process, due diligence, appropriate governance arrangements, and agreed by the council’s Strategic Policy and Resources Committee.  None
Men and women generally  We do not believe that the delivery of the Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund programme or projects will impact the equality of opportunity by this group. The principles underpinning the fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment.  Recommendations on which projects are funded will go through the rigorous open call process, due diligence, appropriate governance arrangements, and agreed by the council’s Strategic Policy and Resources Committee.    None
Disability

The NRF supports the priorities agreed with the City Recovery Framework. The principles underpinning the fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment.

There is potential for minor positive impact relevant to the equality of opportunity of this group. 

Minor

 Dependants We do not believe that the delivery of the Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund programme or projects will impact on the equality of opportunity by this group. The principles underpinning the fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment.  Recommendations on which projects are funded will go through the rigorous open call process, due diligence, appropriate governance arrangements, and agreed by the council’s Strategic Policy and Resources Committee.     None

9. Are there opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity for people within the Section 75 equalities categories?

Section 75 category If 'yes', provide details If 'no', provide reasons
Religious belief This is not applicable

We do not believe that there are opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity in this regard.

Political opinion  This is not applicable

We do not believe that there are opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity in this regard.

Racial group  This is not applicable

We do not believe that there are opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity in this regard.

Age This is not applicable

We do not believe that there are opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity in this regard.

Marital status This is not applicable

We do not believe that there are opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity in this regard.

Sexual orientation This is not applicable

We do not believe that there are opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity in this regard.

Men and women generally  This is not applicable

We do not believe that there are opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity in this regard.

Disability This is not applicable

We do not believe that there are opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity in this regard.

 Dependants This is not applicable

We do not believe that there are opportunities to better promote equality of opportunity in this regard.


10.To what extent is the policy likely to impact (positive or negatively) on good relations between people of different religious belief, political opinion or racial group? What is the level of impact? 

Good relations category Likely impact Level of impact
Religious belief

The NRF supports the priorities agreed with the City Recovery Framework. The principles underpinning the fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment across the city. We believe that there would likely be a minor positive impact on people of different religious beliefs, as this will provide opportunity to promote a shared, welcoming, and vibrant city for tourist and locals alike.

Minor
Political opinion  The NRF supports the priorities agreed with the City Recovery Framework. The principles underpinning the fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment across the city. We believe that there would likely be a minor positive impact on people of different political opinion, as this will provide opportunity to promote a shared, welcoming, and vibrant city.  Minor
Racial group The NRF supports the priorities agreed with the City Recovery Framework. The principles underpinning the fund include equality and good relations and balanced investment across the city. We believe that there would likely be a minor positive impact on people of different racial groups, as this will provide opportunity to promote a shared, welcoming, and vibrant city. The fund is open to all community groups across the city regardless of their racial background.  Minor

11. Are there opportunities to better promote good relations between people of different religious belief, political opinion or racial group?  

Good relations category If 'yes', provide details If 'no', provide details
Religious belief The £8m Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund programme aims to support local regeneration and to address some of the social, economic, and environmental needs of the community. The delivery of the NRF programme and projects provides an opportunity to better promote good relations. The programme is consistent with the council’s Equality and Good Relations Strategy which highlighted that promoting equality and good relations are key to improving the quality of life for everyone in the city; making Belfast a better place to live, work, socialise and do business. This is not applicable
Political opinion 

The £8m Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund programme aims to support local regeneration and to address some of the social, economic, and environmental needs of the community. The delivery of the NRF programme and projects provides an opportunity to better promote good relations. The programme is consistent with the council’s Equality and Good Relations Strategy which highlighted that promoting equality and good relations are key to improving the quality of life for everyone in the city; making Belfast a better place to live, work, socialise and do business. 

This is not applicable
Racial group  The £8m Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund programme aims to support local regeneration and to address some of the social, economic, and environmental needs of the community. The delivery of the NRF programme and projects provides an opportunity to better promote good relations. The programme is consistent to the council’s Equality and Good Relations Strategy which highlighted that promoting equality and good relations are key to improving the quality of life for everyone in the city; making Belfast a better place to live, work, socialise and do business.   This is not applicable

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Section C

Belfast City Council also has legislative obligations to meet under the Disability Discrimination Order. Questions 12 and 13 relate to these areas.

Consideration of Disability Duties

12. Does this proposed policy or decision provide an opportunity for the council to better promote positive attitudes towards disabled people?

Explain your assessment in full

Project proposals that are brought forward under the NRF programme will be mindful of the need towards disabled people. The department will make sure that proposed capital projects are compliant to the DDA regulations, will take due regard to the needs of people with disability, and incorporate it in the designs of the capital scheme if possible. Officers will facilitate consultation and engagement with key stakeholders, including disability-related concerns or issues as early as possible. 


13. Does this proposed policy or decision provide an opportunity to actively increase the participation by disabled people in public life?

Explain your assessment in full

Yes, dependent on the projects which are approved for funding 

Project proposals that are brought forward under the NRF programme will be mindful of the need towards disabled people. The department will make sure that projects will take on early consultation and engagement with key stakeholders including people with disability. 


14. Multiple identities

Provide details of data on the impact of the policy with multiple identities

This is not applicable.


15. Monitoring arrangements

Section 75 places a requirement the council to have equality monitoring arrangements in place:

  • to assess the impact of policies and services
  • to help identify barriers to fair participation
  • to better promote equality of opportunity
Outline what data you will collect in the future to monitor the impact of this policy or decision on equality, good relations and disability duties.
Equality Good Relations Disability Duties

The Physical Programmes Department will monitor and evaluate the benefits and outcomes of the NRF programme, including the aspects on equality, good relations, and disability.  This will make sure that the council is fulfilling its obligations as part of the Equality Scheme and that it is in line with the Belfast Agenda underpinning principles related to good relations and balanced investment. 

NRF programme delivery will be monitored regularly. The programme and project post-monitoring and evaluation will be facilitated and will capture the outcomes in terms of equality, good relations and disability.

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Section D

Formal record of screening decision

Title of proposed policy or decision being screened

Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund Programme  

I can confirm that the proposed policy or decision has been screened for:

  • equality of opportunity and good relations
  • disability duties

On the basis of the answers to the screening questions, I recommend that this policy or decision is:

On the basis of the answers to the screening questions, I recommend that this policy or decision is
Screened in 
It is necessary to conduct an equality impact assessment
Not applicable

Screened out
It is not necessary to conduct an equality impact assessment (no impacts)

Yes
Provide a brief note to explain how this decision was reached.

There is no adverse impact on any Section 75 group

Screened out
Mitigating actions (minor impacts)

  • Provide a brief note to explain how this decision was reached
  • Explain what mitigating actions or policy changes will now be introduced.

Screening assessment completed by

Name:     Shauna Murtagh, Programme Officer Manager

Date: 18 October 2021

Department : Physical Programmes


Screening decision approved by

Name: Sinéad Grimes, Director

Date: 27 October 2021

Department:   Physical Programmes

Please save the Word final version of the completed screening form and email to the Equality and Diversity Officer: equality@belfastcity.gov.uk  A link to this screening form will be provided to the council's Section 75 consultee.

For more information about equality screening, contact:

Lorraine Dennis or Lisa McKee
Equality and Diversity Unit
Belfast City Council
Belfast City Hall
Belfast
BT1 5GS
Telephone:  028 9027 0511
Email: equality@belfastcity.gov.uk

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Footnotes

[1] Equality Commission for Northern Ireland (link opens in new window)
[2] Census of population, NI Statistics and Research Agency, 2011
[3] Census of population, NI Statistics and Research Agency, 2011
[4] Census of population, NI Statistics and Research Agency, 2011
[5] Through Our Eyes, The Housing and Homeless Experience of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans people in Northern Ireland, NIHE, 2015
[6] Office for National Statistics, Sexual Orientation, UK: 2018
[7] Census of population, NI Statistics and Research Agency, 2011

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