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Supplementary Planning Guidance May 2023

Waste Infrastructure

Published: May 2023


Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Policy Context
  3. Locating Waste Management Facilities
  4. Waste Storage Areas and Waste Collection Points
  5. Glossary

Table of Tables

Table of Figures


1 Introduction

1.1 Overview

1.1.1 This Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) provides additional advice and guidance specific to waste as part of the planning process in Belfast. It is intended for use by developers, the public and by planning and housing officers in the assessment and delivery of planning proposals for new development within Belfast.

1.1.2 SPG represents non-statutory planning guidance that supports, clarifies and illustrates by example policies included within the current planning policy framework, including development plans and regional planning guidance. The information set out in this SPG is therefore a material planning consideration in determining planning applications and should be read in conjunction with the existing planning policy framework, most notably the Strategic Planning Policy Statement (SPPS) for Northern Ireland and the Belfast Local Development Plan (LDP).

1.1.3 This Supplementary Planning Guidance document provides further guidance on locating waste management facilities and supports Policy W1 – Environmental impact of a waste management facility, Policy W2 – Waste collection and treatment facilities and Policy W4 – Land improvement as set out in the Belfast LDP Plan Strategy 2035.  

1.1.4 In addition, Chapter 4 provides guidance to assist in the planning and design of waste storage areas and waste collection points for development proposals.  

1.1.5 Sustainable waste management is essential for the health and wellbeing of society and our quality of life. The planning system has an important role to play in ensuring that waste is appropriately managed through the provision of appropriate infrastructure and good design of facilities. The emphasis of waste management in Northern Ireland is on resource management with the need to divert waste away from landfill in favour of more sustainable methods.  There is a recognition of the need for transition of waste services from merely collection, treatment and disposal to making a fundamental contribution to the Circular Economy in Belfast.  

1.1.6 A Circular Economy is one which acts to establish a sustainable pattern of consumption, production and waste, by making the best use and extracting the most value out of the materials we already have.  By maximising the quality of the recyclable material lifted, it becomes a suitable feedstock for local reprocessors and so contributes to the local circular economy. In addition we need to take advantage of the new approaches outlined in the Council’s Waste Management Plan (WMP) 2015 delivered collaboratively by arc21 which will encourage the responsible management of waste and natural resources. 


2.0 Policy Context

2.0.1 The policy context is guided by a number of European Directives and this is reflected in both regional and local planning as well as waste policy. Waste management strategies and plans prepared by DAERA and Councils provide the basis to implement the Directives. The focus of the European Directives is on the sustainable management of waste, protection of the environment, reducing by-products in the first instance and reusing existing resources. Details on the European Directives and NI waste policies are outlined in Appendix 1. 

2.1 Regional Planning Policy and Guidance

Regional Development Strategy (RDS) 2035

2.1.1 The RDS states that managing waste is a significant part of how we treat our environment. Policy RG10: Manage our waste sustainably outlines that we should apply the principles of the Waste Hierarchy as outlined in Article 4 of the EU Waste Framework Directive (See Figure 1). The RDS also promotes the “proximity principle” which states that waste should be dealt with as close as possible to the point of generation in an effort to minimise the negative effects of waste transportation. 

Strategic Planning Policy Statement (SPPS) for Northern Ireland (2015)

2.1.2 The aim of the SPPS is to support wider government policy focused on the sustainable management of waste, and a move towards resource efficiency. The policy objectives of the SPPS for waste management are to:  

  • Promote development of waste management and recycling facilities in appropriate locations;
  • Ensure that detrimental effects on people, the environment, and local amenity associated with waste management facilities (for example pollution) are avoided or minimised; and
  • Secure appropriate restoration of proposed waste management sites for agreed after uses.

Figure 1: Waste hierarchy

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 2.2 Local Planning Policy and Guidance

Plan Strategy

2.2.1 The LDP Plan Strategy (PS) provides the strategic policy framework for the plan area as a whole across a range of topics. It sets out the vision for Belfast as well as the objectives and strategic policies required to deliver that vision. It also includes a suite of topic-based operational policies including those relating to waste infrastructure.

2.2.2 While this SPG seeks to supplement PS policies W1 – Environmental impact of a waste management facility; W2 – Waste collection and treatment facilities; and W4 – Land improvement there may also be other relevant and related policies within the Plan Strategy which will require consideration (see Figure 2).

Local Policies Plan

2.2.3 The Local Policies Plan (LPP) will set out Key Site Requirements (KSRs) for certain zoned sites, which in some cases may include specific direction in relation to waste infrastructure requirements.

Figure 2 Local Development Plan – Policy Context

Local Development Plan – Policy Context


2.3 Planning and Environmental Considerations

Planning

2.3.1 Planning focuses primarily on whether the development itself is an acceptable use of the land rather than on the control of the processes or substances involved.  The planning process will regulate the location of the development, in order to avoid or minimise adverse effects on people, the use of land and the environment. It should not duplicate other statutory controls or be used to achieve objectives relating to other legislation. 

2.3.2 Planning decisions must be made on the basis that the pollution control regimes will be properly applied and enforced. Planning is not an appropriate means of regulating the detailed characteristics of potentially polluting waste management activities. However, matters relevant to a pollution control authorisation or licence may be material planning considerations.  

Pollution Control 

2.3.3 The pollution control regime is concerned with the control and regulation of proposed operations and processes and with their day-to-day operation. The objective is to ensure that the waste is disposed of or treated without endangering human health or causing harm to the environment.

 2.3.4 Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) is a regulatory system that employs an integrated approach to control the environmental impacts of certain industrial activities.  Guidance is available on the DAERA website where it refers to Environmental Permitting Regulations (EPR) rather than IPPC and relates to industry activity including landfill, land spreading, waste incineration, waste recovery and waste treatment. There is also a link to a series of Environmental Permitting technical guidance available from the Environment Agency which outlines how to comply with the Environmental Permit for each activity.  

Environmental Considerations

2.3.5 Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a method of ensuring that the likely effects of new development on the environment are fully understood and taken into account before planning permission is given for the development to proceed. The Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2017 set out a range of developments within two Schedules – 1 and 2 that respectively will require or are likely to require environmental impact assessment. It is mandatory for all proposals which fall within Schedule 1 to submit an Environmental Statement. Under the terms of Schedule 2 the need for an EIA is determined for a proposal on the basis of a screening process. 

2.3.6 Further advice on environmental protection, screening and Environmental Impact Assessment is contained in Development Control Advice Note 10 which can be found under the Planning Guidance section of the DfI Planning website. Pre-application discussion with the Council will address whether a full EIA is required following consideration of the sensitivity of the receiving environment, including adjacent land uses and potential regulation. 

Waste Management Licence 

2.3.7 A Waste Management Licence is required under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997 and the Waste Management Licensing Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2003 if you deposit, keep, treat or dispose of waste. A licence may have specific conditions attached to it, depending on the type of waste and it is dealt with and authorised by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency. Planning permission is required before a new waste management licence is granted. Further details on the licence process can be found on the General guidance for applying for a waste management licence on the DAERA website.

Planning Conditions

2.3.8 When planning permission is given for a waste management facility, the Council may impose conditions or negotiate agreements in order to address particular environmental concerns. Where appropriate, the Council may attach a range of conditions to planning approvals in relation to the following issues:

Table 1: Planning conditions
Planning Conditions
Transport modes, access and routing arrangements, and the volume of traffic generated.  The hours of operation where these may have an impact on neighbouring land-use.
The physical nature of waste acceptable or excluded, insofar as this might affect local amenity or neighbouring land-use. The timescale of the operations and any phasing of uses on a site.
The level of noise. The plant and buildings and ancillary development. 
Landscaping of operational areas and facilities.  Minimising nuisance from dust, birds, vermin or litter. 
The historic environment, industrial heritage and archaeological remains. The protection of surface and underground water. 
Removal, handling and preservation of topsoil and subsoil, and their replacement at the restoration stage.  Precautionary measures against the risks of sites suffering from or causing land instability. 
The area to be filled. Restoration and aftercare.
Parking and servicing arrangements. Any other significant impact on the environment or human health. 

2.3.9 This is not an exhaustive list and other considerations may apply based on site-specific circumstances. It should be noted that where such issues cannot be satisfactorily addressed through mitigating measures, permission is unlikely to be granted.  

Developer Contributions 

2.3.10 Developer Contributions are normally secured by way of a planning agreement provided for in Section 76 of the Planning Act (NI) 2011. For details of the waste-related Section 76 Planning Obligations for new developments, refer to the Belfast City Council Planning Developer Contributions Framework. The Framework should be read in conjunction with the Strategic Planning Policy Statement for Northern Ireland (SPPS)

2.3.11 The Council will consider the use of developer contributions to ensure that new development is supported by sustainable waste infrastructure and to help mitigate the environmental effects of new waste management facilities. The need for developer contributions to either support new development or manage the environmental effects of new waste management facilities will be assessed in consultation with the Council’s Waste Management Team. It is expected that any measures required to mitigate or compensate any adverse environmental effects resulting from waste management facilities are secured as part of the planning permission and will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.  

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3.0  Locating Waste Management Facilities

3.1 Policy W1– Environmental Impact of a Waste Management Facility

Policy W1 - Environmental Impact of a Waste Management Facility

Proposals for the development of a waste management facility will be subject to a thorough examination of environmental effects and planning permission will be granted where it can be demonstrated that all of the following criteria are met...


3.1.1 The criteria for Policy W1 which will require consideration in determining proposals for locating new, or extensions to existing waste management facilities includes the following: 

a. Health Considerations – Proposals for waste facilities should be designed and located so that a high level of protection for the environment and for human health can be ensured. In assessing the public health impact of a waste management facility advice will be sought from the Council’s Environmental Health Services and any other relevant consultee.

b. Compatibility with Adjacent Development - Certain waste management facilities, such as landfill sites or incinerators can cause significant amenity issues for the occupiers of neighbouring properties. However, small-scale developments such as civic amenity sites, waste transfer stations and recycling facilities can be accommodated if it is demonstrated that it will not cause detriment to amenity of the neighbouring properties. The Council will not therefore restrict development solely because it differs from the predominant land use in the locality.

c. Visual Intrusion and Impact on the Landscape - Waste management facilities vary greatly in scale and their potential for impact on the landscape. Consideration must be given to their potential effects on the landscape and waste management facilities will only be permitted where it can be demonstrated that they will not have an unacceptable visual impact on Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and areas designated in the Belfast Local Development Plan for their landscape value. The site planning for a waste management facility must include adequate landscape treatment and a landscaping scheme will be required as an integral part of a planning application.

d. Transport - Most modern waste management facilities depend on a large throughput of materials, often generating a substantial volume of traffic, which may be a significant environmental issue for neighbouring residents and other road users. Proposals offering alternative means to road, of transporting materials, will be welcomed.  In most cases a Transport Assessment will be required and applicants will have to identify lorry routes proposed to service the site, the movement of waste, staff and visitors as well as quantifying construction traffic.  

e. Access - The Council may specify the use of a particular route or require certain routes to be upgraded or strengthened to accommodate additional traffic movements, particularly if HGVs are involved. Where the road network cannot accommodate the numbers of vehicle movements likely to be generated, the application may be refused or where appropriate, planning permission will condition the quantities of materials or the number of vehicle movements over specified periods.

f. Parking and Servicing - Proposals will be expected to provide adequate access, servicing and car parking arrangements for sites as set out in the Transportation section of the Belfast LDP Plan Strategy.

g. Nature Conservation and Built Heritage - Waste management development can cause unacceptable harm to the natural and historic environment. Such damage can be incurred directly through physical destruction or indirectly through pollution, alteration of water tables, dust and other disturbance to sensitive species. Equally unacceptable damage can occur to historic assets including archaeologically sensitive sites. The Council’s planning policy in relation to nature conservation is contained within the Plan Strategy Policy NH1 – Protection of Natural Heritage Resources and planning policy in relation to the built heritage is contained within Plan Strategy policy BH1 – Listed Buildings, BH2 – Conservation Areas and BH3 – Areas of Townscape Character. In determining applications for waste management facilities, the Council will not grant approval where a proposal will cause unacceptable harm to designated areas identified for their natural and historic importance and will seek advice from relevant expert consultees.

h.  Pollution - The operation of many waste management facilities has the potential to produce problems associated with pollution such as noise, airborne and water pollution as well as litter, vermin and birds. The Council will consult with Environmental Health Services and relevant expert consultees including the relevant licensing authority (currently the Northern Ireland Environment Agency) with regard to this issue. Where appropriate, the Council will attach a condition to planning approvals in relation to these issues.

i. Protection of Surface and Groundwater - In assessing proposals, the Council must have regard to the need to protect the quality of surface water and groundwater. Whilst modern containment and drainage engineering has significantly reduced the likelihood of water contamination, waste facilities have the potential to pollute surface and groundwater resources if operations are not properly controlled and monitored. In particular problems can arise from surface water run-off, landfill leachate and the discharge of wastewater from waste management operations such as composting and recycling plants. Developers must ensure that a suitable drainage system is proposed which will prevent contaminants from reaching surface water drains or groundwater resources. Planning conditions will be imposed to ensure that there is no possibility of run-off, spillage or leachate pollution of surface or ground waters.

j. Flooding from Rivers - DfI Rivers is consulted on applications for development which would have drainage implications – for example those affecting watercourses or where land is subject to flooding. Waste management proposals will not be acceptable where the proposed development would exacerbate the risk from flooding on site or would be likely to increase the risk of flooding elsewhere. Works required to alleviate flood risk may result in unacceptable damage to visual amenity, nature conservation interest or built heritage. On the limited occasions where exceptions to this policy arise and planning permission is granted, conditions may be imposed to require necessary alleviation works and to ensure adequate access to watercourses. In addition, Schedule 6 of the Drainage (NI) Order 1973, requires the consent of DfI Rivers for any discharge into a waterway.

k. Agricultural Land Quality - High quality agricultural land is an important resource. Once developed, the return to viable agricultural use is rarely feasible. It is important to protect, as far as is practicable, the best and most versatile agricultural land from development. Where possible, planning policy will be to avoid the loss of high-grade land but on occasions the need for a waste management facility may be the overriding consideration. Particular consideration will be given to directing development to areas of poorer agricultural quality land and encouraging the re-use of redundant or derelict land.

l. Reinstatement of the Site - When the operation of a waste management site comes to an end it must be left in a fit state for beneficial subsequent use. Licence conditions and sound management will ensure that ground contamination is minimised or kept to an acceptable level. Restoration should take place as soon as possible after the disposal of waste. A Restoration and Aftercare Plan may be required which includes details of design, initial landscaping works, soil spreading, final landform construction and aftercare. Aftercare is the work done after the replacement of the soil and includes cultivations, fertilising, planting, construction of pathways, access points, vegetation maintenance and an ongoing long-term commitment to the restored land. Landscaping should promote and enhance biodiversity on the finished landform.


3.2 Policy W2 - Waste Collection and Treatment Facilities

Policy W2 - Waste Collection and Treatment Facilities

Planning permission will be granted for the development of a waste collection or treatment facility where:


3.2.1 The need for the facility is established – To achieve sustainable waste management it is important to provide an integrated and adequate network of waste facilities which will enable the aspirations of the waste hierarchy to be delivered. In assessing the likely extent of future waste management facilities, the Council will be informed by the current Northern Ireland Waste Management Strategy (NIWMS) and Waste Management Plan (WMP) for the area.

3.2.2 It is in line with the proximity principle - Waste should be disposed of or recovered in one of the nearest appropriate facilities ensuring that the environment and human health are protected. From a sustainability perspective it may be more appropriate to transport waste to an existing Energy from Waste (EfW) facility rather than build another facility.

3.2.3 It conforms to the principle of the Waste Hierarchy (Figure 1) – All proposals for the development of waste management facilities across the council area should favour prevention and reuse followed by recycling and finally disposal. The aim is to ensure that waste treatment is driven as far up the hierarchy as possible.

3.2.4 It is not detrimental to the environment or human health – Proposals for waste facilities should be designed and located so that a high level of protection for environmental and human health can be ensured.  As waste is increasingly dealt with higher up the waste hierarchy, it is likely that many modern waste facilities will have less impact on neighbouring land uses. In addition as waste is increasingly dealt with by reuse, more opportunities may be sought to locate close to the source. For example it may be appropriate to locate reuse facilities within commercial or retail areas.

Hazardous Waste
 
3.2.5 Hazardous Waste is defined by European Council Directive 91/689/EEC (the Hazardous Waste Directive). The Hazardous Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) came into operation in 2005 and replaced the Special Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1998 and apply to those who produce, broker, deal, carry and receive hazardous waste to keep, treat or dispose of. The purpose of the Regulations is to provide an effective system of control for hazardous waste in order to ensure that they are properly managed from their point of production through to their final destination for disposal or recovery. The nature of hazardous waste and the need to protect the public from any harmful effects associated with noise, smell, fumes and dust emphasise the importance that needs to be placed on the safe treatment of such waste and to reducing the amount that requires disposal.  

3.2.6 The arc21 Waste Management Plan (September 2015) addresses the current arrangements for the management of hazardous wastes within the arc21 region which includes Belfast. The WMP aims to ensure that operators are aware of their requirements with respect to the treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes. A range of specialist treatment facilities are needed to handle Northern Ireland’s hazardous waste, as described in the various Councils' Waste Management Plans.

3.2.7 In determining applications for managing hazardous waste consideration will be given to the compatibility of the operation with other nearby land uses. It must be demonstrated that the built development associated with proposed methods of handling, storage, treatment and processing of waste is appropriate to the nature and hazards of the waste(s) concerned. Local impacts, including the comparison of alternative sites, should be addressed through Environmental Impact Assessment when specific sites are being considered.


3.3 Policy W4 – Land Improvement

Policy W4 - Land Improvement

Planning permission will be granted for the disposal of inert waste by its deposition on land where it is demonstrated that it will result in land improvement and all of the following criteria are met: 

a. It will not result in an unacceptable adverse environmental impact that cannot be prevented or appropriately controlled by mitigating measures (see Policy W1);
b. It can be demonstrated that there is a local need for the development;
c. Only the minimum quantity of fill necessary to achieve the proposed improvement shall be deposited; and
d. Detailed measures are included for the appropriate restoration and aftercare of sites that will help to enhance biodiversity 


3.3.1 The following sections set out the circumstances when agricultural land improvement does not require express planning permission.

3.3.2 Under the Planning (General Permitted Development) Order (Northern Ireland) 2015, a planning application is not required for the carrying out, on agricultural land comprised in an agricultural unit, any excavation or engineering operations reasonably necessary for the purposes of agriculture. Agricultural land improvement can fall into this category provided the Council is satisfied that the following conditions are met:

  • the development is on an agricultural land holding of at least 0.5 hectares in area; and
  • no part of the development is within 24 metres from the nearest part of a special road, or within 24 metres of the middle of a trunk or a first or second-class road or 9 metres from the middle of other classes of road. 

3.3.3 In deciding whether or not such land improvement is reasonably necessary for the purposes of agriculture or amounts to a separate land use activity in its own right, the Council will take the following considerations into account: 

  • whether the amount of material brought onto the site is the minimum required to achieve the needed improvement;
  • the nature of the material being deposited;
  • the extent, scale and duration of the operations involved;
  • the quality of the agricultural land being filled; and
  • whether the landowner is a farmer actively engaged in farming operations on the holding.

3.3.4 The Council will consider the circumstances of each case to ensure that the proposed development is required for genuine agricultural purposes. Where a planning exemption is made, an application should still be made to DAERA under the waste management licensing regulations to register an exempt activity for the purpose of reclamation, restoration or improvement of land which has been subject to industrial or other man-made development where the use to which that land could be put would be improved by the spreading of waste, as would be the case for land improvement. This is referred to as a ‘Paragraph 11 exemption’ application.

3.3.5 The activity and the quantity of waste used, must be carried out in accordance with any planning permission (where such permission is required) or planning exemption. The relevant planning permission, relevant planning drawings and cross-sections must be submitted with the Paragraph 11 exemption application. The waste must be spread to a depth not exceeding the lesser of 2 metres or the final cross-sections shown on any plan or drawings required to be submitted in support of the exemption application. The waste spread must not exceed 20,000 cubic metres per hectare.  

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4.0 Waste Storage Areas and Waste Collection Points

4.1 Introduction

4.1.1 This section outlines guidance to ensure applicants and developers provide appropriate facilities for the effective segregation, storage and collection of waste materials within development proposals. The guidance applies to any new development proposals, altered buildings, any redevelopments and any change of use or conversion of existing buildings which require planning permission. This includes domestic, non-domestic, commercial and light industrial buildings. 

4.1.2 Waste management considerations should be integral to the overall design of a proposal and not an afterthought. Developers should therefore consider the waste infrastructure needs of new development at the outset. The Council will encourage innovative solutions to waste management that reduce costs, promote transport sustainability and minimise the impact on the public realm. Developers will be expected to incorporate sustainable waste management arrangements within their scheme and contribute to the improvement of existing waste management infrastructure that will support it. 

4.1.3 The Council’s Pre-Application Discussion service may be used to discuss waste management issues at an early stage. Developers should refer to the Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland (September 2010) and the Council’s own suite of waste storage guidelines when considering the location, design and capacity of waste storage facilities and collection points.


4.2 Building Regulations

4.2.1 This SPG brings together key Building Control considerations relevant to the planning application process. This is to ensure that developers have a comprehensive and early appreciation of all of the design factors pertaining to waste storage areas and collection points. By doing this the SPG aims to ensure good quality design and help to ensure that planning approvals have sufficient scope to comply with the Building Regulations without any fundamental redesign. 

4.2.2  The Building Regulations set performance standards for the design and construction of buildings. Domestic and commercial building works involving new build developments, extensions and alterations to existing buildings are subject to the Building Regulations. Applicants should check with Building Control as to whether or not they will require building regulation approval.

4.2.3 The Building Regulations set out how to deal with waste in the Technical Booklet J – Solid waste in buildings. This includes information on the regulations for the storage and removal of solid waste and on-site treatment of solid waste from buildings.


4.3 Submitting Planning Applications

4.3.1 Planning applications for new commercial or mixed use developments, or where a development proposes the use of communal waste storage, should include a Waste Management Plan. The purpose of a Waste Management Plan is to ensure that appropriate provision is made for: 

  • accommodating the total waste generated from a development;
  • facilitating the segregation of waste as necessary; and
  •  allowing convenient and safe access and egress for the storage and collection of waste.

A Waste Management Plan should clearly set out the Waste Management Plan Checklist (Table 2) including:

  • Estimated volumes of each type of waste arising (i.e. general waste; dry recycling; glass; or food and organic waste as appropriate).
  • The design and management arrangements for any proposed compacting or bailing equipment; waste chute system; or any new or alternative waste storage or collection methods to be used.
  • The numbers and types of containers that will be used for each waste type.
  • The location, size and design of the waste storage area(s) and the numbers and types of containers to be accommodated for each waste type.
  • How commercial and household waste will be segregated in mixed use developments and how waste from different commercial properties will be segregated.
  • How waste will be transported to the storage area(s) and to the waste collection point including details of the design specification for these paths and routes. 
  • The location and size of the waste collection point.
  • How and by whom waste will be collected from the development including details of access for refuse collection vehicles and frequency of collection(s).

4.3.2 Further information relating to the preparation and content of a Waste Management Plan can be found in the Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland (September 2010) and the Council’s suite of supplementary waste storage guidance.


4.4 Estimating the Volume and Breakdown of Waste Arising

4.4.1 For any domestic development which intends to use communal waste storage and all non-domestic or commercial developments it will be necessary to estimate the volume of each type of waste arising between collections in order to calculate how much storage space is required.  

4.4.2 For mixed use developments, commercial and household waste should be stored separately and therefore the respective required storage capacities should be calculated separately.  

4.4.3 Applicants should refer to Table 6 Typical Weekly Waste Arisings in Appendix 2 which indicates the typical waste arising (in litres) on a weekly basis for various types of domestic and non-domestic or commercial properties. This volume should be treated as a total which includes residual and recyclable waste.  

Residential

 4.4.4 For any individual dwelling which is to be provided with its own set of bins, no calculation is needed and this step can be omitted.

4.4.5 For residential developments intending to employ communal bins, guidance on calculating waste arisings and the appropriate breakdown into various types of waste is provided in the Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland. This should be used in conjunction with the Council's own supplementary waste storage guidance for housing and apartment developments and purpose-built managed student accommodation developments which is available from the Council's website.

Non-Domestic or Commercial 

4.4.6 Guidance on determining the volume and breakdown of waste arisings for commercial developments is provided in the Council's supplementary waste storage guidance for commercial developments which should be used in conjunction with the Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland. The Council guidance is aimed at commercial and business rather than industrial or other non-domestic applications but similar principles will apply to those developments. 


4.5 Calculating the Type and Number of Waste Containers Required

4.5.1 Based on the volumes of waste arrived at in section 4.4, and the frequency of collection, applicants must then calculate the type and number of bins required to accommodate each of the various types of waste between collections.  

Domestic or Residential

4.5.2 Guidance on frequency of collection and understanding the appropriate types and numbers of bins for residential waste arisings in Belfast can be found in the Council’s supplementary waste storage guidance for housing and apartment developments and purpose-built managed student accommodation developments. Further information is available from the Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland.

Non-Domestic or Commercial

4.5.3 Guidance on the frequency of collection and the type and number of bins required for each waste stream can be found in the Council's supplementary waste storage guidance for commercial developments which should be used in conjunction with the Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland

4.5.4 For businesses which are generating food waste, the collection frequency should be adequate to minimise odours and the risk of vermin. These businesses should also be aware of, and take into consideration the requirements of the most up-to-date food waste regulations (see Appendix 1).


4.6 Size and Layout of a Waste Storage Area

4.6.1 The applicant must provide a layout of the waste storage area demonstrating that all of the required bins can be accommodated in a way that:

  • users can easily deposit any type of waste into the corresponding bins without moving them around; and
  • bins can be easily removed for collection. 

Bin storage areas should have a non-permeable surface that is easily washed. Residential and Non-Domestic or Commercial waste should be stored separately to minimise the possibility of free uplift with household waste. 

Residential

 4.6.2 The waste storage area for use by a single dwelling should not be less than 1.8m x 1.2m. Communal bin storage areas can be a cost-effective solution to waste storage. These areas should be included within the boundary of the development. The size of the waste storage area required can be calculated using Tables 7 to 10 in Appendix 2.

Non-Domestic or Commercial

4.6.3 The size of the waste storage area required for the bins can be calculated using Tables 7 to 10 in Appendix 2.

4.6.4 The size of the space will depend on the frequency of collection arranged with the contractor. Table 11 in Appendix 2 details how the required storage capacity relates to the collection frequency. The storage layout should accommodate the possibility of missed collections and any expected changes in waste collection frequencies, systems or methods.  

4.6.5 Each non-domestic or commercial property should have its own storage area or a management system to ensure that customers are paying only for their own waste.


4.7 Location and Design of Waste Storage Provision

The siting and design of the bin storage areas and enclosures should not have a harmful impact on visual or residential amenity. They should be sited to provide convenient access for users and for moving bins to and from the collection point.   


4.7.1 The location and design of bin storage areas should adhere to the following (Table 3) requirements for General Principles for Waste Storage Areas:

  • The waste storage area should be a maximum of 25m from the collection point and a maximum of 30m from any property it serves.  
  • The waste storage area should be sited such that the waste containers can be removed without being taken through a dwelling or any other building, other than a garage, carport or other open covered space.
  • Waste should not be stored on a public highway or in any public area or in an area that is plainly visible from the main public route past a property. 
  • It should be sensitively integrated within their surroundings and reflect the building design, materials and architecture. 
  • It should not obstruct sight lines for pedestrians, wheelers, cyclists or drivers.
  • It should not obstruct fire exits or any utility service points.
  • The waste storage area should not obstruct access paths or property entrances and exits. 
  • Be away from windows or ventilation and preferably under cover or shade to reduce the potential for odours. 
  • Be sited and designed to minimise the fire hazard and the risk of arson.
  • Be sited in such a way as to ensure it does not make it easy to gain illegal access to the property (for example allowing an intruder to climb on bins to enter windows)
  • Be at the side or rear of the property or as a last resort it should be placed on the front. Where possible, it should be screened from external view using planting, fencing, walls or other appropriate structures. 
  • Have access paths and dropped kerbs with a suitable width of 1.2m for the use of residents in wheelchairs. 
  • Be located so that any potential nuisance from spillage, odour, noise and visual impact is prevented. 

4.8 New Residential Developments (Policy RD1)

4.8.1 All new residential developments are required to provide adequate internal and external storage (bin store) for all dedicated waste streams; recycling (separate collections of cans and plastics, cardboard, paper and glass), garden waste, food waste and residual waste (see section 4.4). It is required to segregate recycling at the source which means it requires materials to be separated at point of production. As a consequence, consideration is needed for the storage of the relevant bins at the design stage of a development (see sections 4.5 and 4.6).

4.8.2 It should be noted that apartment developments may locate the bin store area internal to the footprint of the building, in a basement or garage area (see section 4.7). It is not acceptable for waste to be stored for a long period of time within a dwelling. The external storage space required for bins will depend on the type of housing and number of residents.  

4.8.3 To enable and encourage occupants of new residential units to recycle, developers should provide adequate space for segregated and stored waste. This space, internal to the dwelling, usually within the kitchen, is for daily segregation of recyclable materials from other waste and storage before it is moved to the bin store. The bin store should not be contained within the unit, dwelling or apartment (see section 4.7). 

4.8.4 Applicants should refer to sections 4.1 to 4.7 for details on estimating volume of waste, size, layout, location and design of waste storage facilities. Further details on requirements for different types of residential development is provided in the Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland which sets out the expected bin provision based on the type of housing and the number of residents. Applicants should also refer to the Council's own supplementary waste storage guidance for housing and apartment developments and purpose-built managed student accommodation developments Further information on these requirements can be found in Appendix 2.


4.9 Residential extensions and alterations (Policy RD2)

4.9.1 Applicants should refer to sections 4.1 to 4.7 for details on estimating volume of waste, size, layout, location and design of waste storage facilities.  It is expected that extensions will leave at least 1m clearance between the extension and the boundary to allow for maintenance and access, including the movement of bins to and from collection points. An exception may be permitted where a route can be maintained via a garage or carport or other open covered space on the ground floor.

4.9.2 Bin storage must be adequately provided for and a proposed extension must leave enough space to accommodate the number and type(s) of bins held at the property, in line with the guidance in section 4.6 and the corresponding tables. The general principles outlined in Table 3 apply. It is not appropriate for bins to be stored to the front of properties as these areas provide a public aspect and can adversely affect the character and appearance of the area.

4.9.3 While bins should be stored to the rear of properties, the storage of bins to the side-rear of a property may be permitted where it is demonstrated that:

  • sufficient space to accommodate the bins is available without impeding rear access;
  • appropriate screening will be in place and maintained in order to hide the bins from public view; and
  • the storage of bins will not result in the loss of in-curtilage car parking provision.

4.9.4 Any proposal for screening will be assessed on a case-by-case basis, taking account of all relevant factors, including any impact on the existing property and surrounding area. 


4.10 Conversion or sub-division of existing buildings for residential use (Policy RD3)

4.10.1 Applications for conversion or sub-division for residential use should refer to sections 4.1 to 4.7 for details on estimating volume of waste, size, layout, location and design of waste storage facilities.  

4.10.2 Refuse storage must be adequately provided for and a proposed conversion or subdivision of a building for residential use must leave enough space within the curtilage of the site to accommodate the number and type(s) of bins required. The principles outlined in section 4.6 must be applied. 

4.10.3 Any proposal for screening will be assessed on a case-by-case basis, taking account of all relevant factors, including any impact on the existing property and its surrounding area.


4.11 Non-domestic or Commercial Developments

4.11.1 For non-domestic or commercial developments applicants should produce a Waste Management Plan to cover all design and management considerations (see section 4.3 for further information). All industrial and commercial premises must ensure their waste is managed and disposed of correctly. Owners or managers of non-domestic properties (for example businesses, schools, and libraries) are responsible for arranging the collection and disposal of the waste they generate. The Council provide a commercial waste service to meet this need, but many other private waste collection contractors also provide a commercial waste service.  

4.11.2 Commercial contractors will offer a range of collection frequencies with varying waste storage receptacles both for residual and recycling streams. The preferred commercial contractor should be contacted to discuss potential arrangements before submitting planning applications.  


4.12 Mixed Use Developments

4.12.1 In a mixed use development, a strict separation of waste is required to ensure that commercial waste does not enter the domestic waste stream. For example, a mixed residential and retail development must provide separate refuse storage areas for residential and commercial use. The locations must be identified on site plans detailing this separation. All enclosures and waste storage areas should be located within the property boundary, be visible and easily accessible to users and residents to encourage use.  

4.12.2  Applicants should produce a Waste Management Plan to cover all design and management considerations (see section 4.3 for further information).


4.13 Communal Waste Storage

4.13.1 In addition to the general principles outlined in Table 3, communal waste storage areas should ensure the Table 4: Communal Waste Storage Areas requirements are reflected in the design:

  • Be sized in accordance with the waste arising guidance set out in Appendix 2 Table 6 Typical Weekly Waste Arisings. 
  • The enclosure should be constructed and finished in keeping with the surroundings or screened off, using boundary walls, fencing or planting. 
  • Be designed such that store doors and gates do not open over the public highway and have a facility to hold doors during collection. 
  • Allow the container to be withdrawn without removing another container and allow the lid of the bin to be fully opened. 
  • Be screened to a height of 1.8m if a roof is not provided and allow a headroom of 2m for pedestrians.  
  • Any roller doors must have a clearance of 2.4m.
  • Surfaces should be smooth and impervious to permit cleaning and drainage. Natural light or artificial lights are required to allow safe handling of bins. 
  • Be designed and managed such that access to the storage area is easy for residents or legitimate users but difficult for others. 
  • The store should incorporate clear signage and markings to identify the bin stores. 
Residential

4.13.2 Communal waste storage areas for dwellings should be located within the property boundary and be visible and easily accessible to users to encourage use. For apartment developments communal waste storage areas may be internal to the overall complex for example in a basement car park. However, it is not permitted to remove the waste container through the dwelling or any other building, other than a garage, carport or other open covered space. The design should ensure that bins can be easily moved between the store and collection point.  

4.13.3 Communal waste storage areas for dwellings (houses or apartments) can cause difficulties for maximising recycling and minimising contamination. It is expected that developers implement the following measures to make sure that recycling is optimised:  

  • Manage waste storage areas so that there is always enough space available for residual waste, dry recycling and food waste, and that this is accessible at all times.
  • Provide information and signage for tenants about the waste management arrangements and which items should be placed in which bin.
  • Co-operate with the Council to promote recycling among residents.
  • Make sure tenants comply with waste and recycling arrangements as a condition of their tenancy agreement.
  • Ensure communal bin stores have a sealed surface that can easily be washed.
Commercial

 4.13.4 The communal waste storage areas for commercial developments must be located within the property boundary and designed to ensure bins can be moved easily between the store and the collection point. It is not permitted to remove the waste container through buildings, other than a basement, garage or other open covered space.  

4.13.5 Applicants should refer to the Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland and the Council’s supplementary waste storage guidance for commercial developments for guidance on the location, size and design of the storage area(s) to ensure that the arrangements are satisfactory at an early stage. Additional consideration should be given to waste storage in commercial properties where waste is more likely to present a health risk, such as at food premises. The Council’s Environmental Health Service should be contacted for further guidance.


4.14 Considerations for Waste Collection Points

4.14.1 A waste collection point should be of sufficient area to accommodate all bins and containers and allow for the waste to be presented without blocking access for pedestrians, wheelers, cyclists and other vehicles.

4.14.2 For individual dwellings the collection point should be at or outside the boundary of the property. For large apartment complexes or private residential developments it may be possible to locate the collection point within the bounds of the development subject to a refuse collection vehicle (RCV) being able to access and navigate the development.

4.14.3 For all developments the waste collection point should be no more than 3m from the nearest suitable access point for the refuse collection vehicle (RCV). The path between the collection point and the nearest RCV access should:

  • Avoid vehicular traffic, car parking areas and other obstacles.
  • Have a firm base and a smooth continuous surface.
  • Be free of steps or kerbs (a dropped kerb or cross-over should be used where necessary).
  • Have minimal gradient(s) and be of sufficient width to accommodate the types of bin or container being used.

Table 5: General requirements for Waste Collection Points

4.14.4 In relation to access arrangements for RCVs the design of access and road layouts should allow for safe and efficient manoeuvring and minimise the need for reversing. Where reversing is unavoidable an appropriate turning area free from parked vehicles and other obstacles should be provided.

4.14.5 Further detailed guidance on the siting, design and access considerations for waste collection points can be found in the Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland.

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5.0 Glossary

NOTE: Although the following definitions are intended for use only in relation to the guidance given in this document, they are also consistent with the intent of relevant legislation. 

Circular Economy – An alternative to a traditional linear economy (take, make, use, dispose) which acts to establish a sustainable pattern of consumption, production and waste, by making the best use and extracting the most value out of the materials we already have.

Collection Frequency – How often (frequently) waste is collected. This normally ranges from daily to weekly or alternate-weekly.

Commercial Waste - Waste which arises from general operations in non-domestic properties. It does not include wastes such as clinical waste or hazardous waste which need specialised disposal services. 

Commercial Waste Service - A chargeable service provided by a council or private contractor to collect and dispose of commercial waste. 

Container - Term used as some councils or commercial waste services may accept waste in bags and boxes as well as bins. 

Household Waste - Waste which arises from dwellings in the course of normal household activities. It does not include wastes such as clinical waste or hazardous waste which need specialised disposal services. 

Recovery - Any operation the principal result of which is waste serving a useful purpose by replacing other materials which would otherwise have been used to fulfil a particular function, or waste being prepared to fulfil that function, in the plant or in the wider economy.  The Waste Framework Directive (2008/98/EC) definition.  

Recycling - Any recovery operation by which waste materials are reprocessed into products, materials or substances whether for the original or other purposes. It includes the reprocessing of organic material but does not include energy recovery and the reprocessing into materials that are to be used as fuels or for backfilling operations.  The Waste Framework Directive (2008/98/EC) definition. 

Recyclable Waste - A waste which can be used as or processed into a usable resource rather than being sent to landfill. 

Residual Waste - Waste which cannot be recycled; the waste that is left after recyclable waste has been taken out.

Waste – Any substance or object that the producer, user, or person in possession of it discards, intends to discard or is required to discard.

Waste Arisings - The waste arising from, being generated by, or coming out of a property.

Waste Collection Point – The physical location where a property owner or user should present the waste in order for the refuse collection crew to collect it (sometimes referred to as the bin collection point).

Waste Storage Area - An area (whether open or enclosed) where waste is stored.

Wheeler and Wheeling – Wheeling is a term that includes people who use a wheelchair or mobility scooter as well as those in prams or buggies who wheel rather than walk or cycle.

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Appendix 1

European Policy and Guidance

Waste Framework Directive (WFD)

The aim of the Waste Framework Directive (WFD) is to address the amount of waste generated, maximise recycling and re-use, limit incineration to non-recyclable materials and turn the EU into a recycling society. The WFD sets out a Waste Hierarchy and promotes life cycle thinking and the circular economy. 

Landfill Directive

In light of the effects of land-filled biodegradable waste on climate change, the EU Landfill Directive set statutory targets for reducing the quantities of land-filled biodegradable municipal waste. The EU Landfill Directive has had a significant impact on waste management practices and the diversion of biodegradable waste from landfill.

EU Circular Economy Package

The EU Circular Economy Package contains a suite of directives which aim to support the establishment of the circular economy, moving beyond waste management into resource management and establishing a more environmentally sustainable pattern of consumption, production and waste: 

  • Measures to ensure environmentally sustainable resource management for specific materials;
  • Encouraging business models which promote environmentally sustainable resource management; 
  • Ambitious recycling targets (55 per cent by 2025, 60 per cent by 2030 and 65 per cent by 2035); and
  • Landfill limited to 10 per cent by 2035.

These amending directives have been transposed into regional legislation through The Waste (Circular Economy) (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2020.

Regional Policy and Guidance

The Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2011

The Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2011 transpose the revised Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC in Northern Ireland and contains amendments to the Amendment of the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997. 

Landfill Legislation 

The requirements of the Landfill Directive were transposed through the Landfill Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2003, the Waste and Emissions Trading Act 2003 and the Landfill Allowances Scheme (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2004 (as amended). Further information can be found on the DAERA website.

Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997

Under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997 and the Waste Management Licensing Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2003, all activities involving the treatment, keeping or disposal of waste must be authorised by NIEA.  Some activities are exempt from licensing if they meet the requirements of Regulation 17 of the Waste Management Licensing Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2003. If you want to operate under the terms of these exemptions you must register with NIEA. Schedule 2, Part 1, Paragraph 19 of the Waste Management Licensing Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2003 allows specified wastes to be used and stored for the purpose of relevant work. “Relevant work” means work for the purposes of construction, maintenance or improvement of: (a) a building, road, railway, airport, dock or other transport facility, (b) recreational facilities, (c) drainage; or (d) a waterway but does not include any work involving land reclamation. 

The requirements of the revised WFD have been transposed into NI legislation through the Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2011.

The Food Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015

These regulations amend the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997 to provide for the separate collection of food waste and as such they may have implications for waste storage. They place a duty on food businesses producing in excess of 5kg of food waste per week to present food waste for separate collection and place a duty on businesses to ensure food waste is not deposited in a lateral drain or sewer. Further guidance can be found on the DAERA website.

Delivering Resource Efficiency, The Northern Ireland Waste Management Strategy (NIWMS) 2013

Delivering Resource Efficiency supersedes the 2006 document and contains actions and targets to meet EU Directive requirements and Programme for Government commitments.  The document builds on the 2006 Waste Management Strategy, placing renewed emphasis on the waste hierarchy and focusing on resource efficiency over landfill diversion. 

Waste Management Plan for Northern Ireland (WMPNI), 2019

The Waste Management Plan for Northern Ireland (WMPNI) tasked Councils with setting out policies and proposals in their LDPs that support the SPPS Waste Management Regional Strategic Objectives and Policy, tailored to the local circumstances and to assess the likely extent of future waste management facilities for the plan area. 

Specific sites for the development of waste management facilities should be identified in the LDP together with key site requirements. In deciding on sites for facilities, councils should assess their suitability against the criteria set out in the policy. This includes the physical and environmental constraints on development, existing and proposed neighbouring land uses, and any significant adverse impacts on the quality of the local environment. The policy direction set out in the LDP Plan Strategy should continue to facilitate the shift away from landfill, towards a more sustainable and circular economy.

Climate Change Act (Northern Ireland) 2022

The Climate Change Act (Northern Ireland) 2022 sets targets for the years 2030, 2040 and 2050 for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions as well as providing for a system of carbon budgeting. DAERA are required to develop and publish sectoral plans for the waste management sector setting out how the sector will contribute to the achievement  of the emissions reduction targets as well as ensuring that at least 70 per cent of waste is recycled by 2030.

Local Policy and Guidance

Belfast Agenda, Belfast City Council, 2017

Belfast’s Community Plan, the Belfast Agenda sets out our joint vision and long-term ambitions for Belfast’s future, as well as outlining priorities for action. Part of the vision is “It will be a city that will encourage walking, cycling and the use of public transport, as well as recycling waste and improving energy efficiency”. Belfast’s household recycling levels have made significant progress and over 40 per cent of domestic waste is now recycled. However, much reusable and economically useful material is still being lost to landfill and a figure of 70 per cent should be possible. The circular economy is an under-exploited opportunity that has the potential to support jobs and business growth. 

The Belfast Agenda goes on to discuss managing resources and waste, stating that successful cities manage the impact of growth and ensure that it does not limit the quality of life of future generations. This includes reducing our consumption of non-renewable resources and minimising and managing waste effectively.  

Waste Agenda Framework - Optimisation of Waste to 2025 and Beyond, Belfast City Council, April 2017 

The Waste Agenda Framework outlines the implications to Belfast City Council of a 'do-nothing' approach in terms of waste and recycling and the likely cost including political and reputational repercussions. It also includes a costed option appraisal of three alternatives and the likely rate each would yield beyond the 40 per cent recycling rate Belfast has already achieved.

The document indicates that a 'business as usual' approach will not enable the Council to meet the targets and puts forward an alternative approach based on a multi-stream kerbside sort scheme. This recommendation involves significant capital costs and will require a financing plan.

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Appendix 2

Table 6: Typical Weekly Waste Arisings

Building Weekly Waste Calculation Example Weekly Waste Arising (litres)
Dwelling (not HMO)
This estimate assumes residential purposes only; if the dwelling is also used for any non-domestic purposes, the relevant arisings should be separately estimated and planned for. 
70L per bedroom + 30L per dwelling  3-bedroom house 240
House in Multiple Occupation 100L per bedroom + 60L per dwelling  3-bedroom house 360
Office 50L per employee 10 employees 500
Shopping Centre 10L per sqm of sales area  25,000sqm sales area 250,000
Fast Food Outlet 5L per sake 45,000 sales per week 225,000
Department Store 10L per sqm of sales area  3,700sqm 37,000
Restaurant 75L per dining space 30 dining spaces 2,250
4 or 5-Star Hotel 350L per bedroom 370 bedrooms 129,500
2 or 3-Star Hotel 250L per bedroom 100 bedrooms 25,000
1-Star Hotel or Bed and Breakfast 150L per bedroom 5 bedrooms 750
Supermarket (small – sales area up to 1500sqm)  100L per sqm of sales area 800sqm sales area  80,000
Supermarket (large – sales area more than 1500sqm)  150L per sqm of sales area  2,000sqm sales area  300,000
Industrial Unit 5L per sqm of floor area  2,000sqm floor area 10,000
School 2,500L per 100 pupils  700 pupils 17,500

Source: Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland (2010)


Note - Tables 7 to 10 assume either a single row layout (containers in a row beside one another, with the lids opening at the front) or an opposing rows layout (two single rows, with the lids opening at the front, facing one another) (see Figure 3, Appendix 2). Other layouts may be used so long as all relevant design requirements are adhered to.

Table 7: Container Capacity 240L

Number of containers Minimum storage area dimensions (m)
Single row layout Opposing rows layout
Not enclosed Enclosed Not enclosed Enclosed
1-3 1.2 x 1.8 2.0 x 1.8 2.8 x 1.2 2.8 x 1.2
4 1.2 x 2.4 2.0 x 2.4 2.8 x 1.2 2.8 x 1.2
Single Row Layout – For each additional container add at least the following discrete area while maintaining a rectangular area overall: 1.2 x 0.6 2.0 x 0.6    
Single Row Layout (Not Enclosed) – Minimum additional clearance space required to front of row: 0.8 x row length      
Opposing Row Layout – For each additional container or pair of containers add at least the following discrete area while maintaining a rectangular area overall:     2.8 x 0.6 2.8 x 0.6
Thus, for example, 5 bins would need a dedicated storage area of at least: 1.2 x 3.0 (plus an adjacent usable clear area of 0.8 x 3.0 to make a total area of 2.0 x 3.0)  2.0 x 3.0 2.8 x 1.8 2.8 x 1.8
Minimum Door or Gate Clearance    1.0   1.0
Minimum Operating Corridor (2 or more containers in a row; 2 or more containers opposing) 1.2

Source: Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland (2010)


Table 8 Container Capacity 360L

Number of containers Minimum storage area dimensions (m)
Single Row Layout Opposing rows layout
Not enclosed Enclosed Not enclosed Enclosed
1-3 1.4 x 2.1 2.4 x 2.1 3.3 x 1.4 3.3 x 1.4
4 1.4 x 2.8 2.4 x 2.8 3.3 x 1.4 3.3 x 1.4
Single Row Layout – For each additional container add at least the following discrete area while maintaining a rectangular area overall: 1.4 x 0.7 2.4 x 0.7    
Single Row Layout (Not Enclosed) – Minimum additional clearance space required to front of row: 1.0 x row length      
Opposing Row Layout – For each additional container or pair of containers add at least the following discrete area while maintaining a rectangular area overall:      3.3 x 0.7 3.3 x 0.7
Thus, for example, 5 bins would need a dedicated storage area of at least:  1.4 x 3.5 (plus an adjacent usable clear area of 1.0 x 3.0 to make a total area of 2.4 x 3.5)  2.4 x 3.5 3.3 x 2.1 3.3 x 2.1
Minimum Door or Gate Clearance    1.0   1.0
Minimum Operating Corridor (2 or more containers in a row; 2 or more containers opposing)  1.5

Source: Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland (2010)


Table 9: Container Capacity 660L

Number of containers Minimum storage area dimensions (m)
Single row layout Opposing rows layout
Not enclosed Enclosed Not enclosed Enclosed
1-2 1.4 x 3.0 2.2 x 3.0 3.0 x 1.5 3.0 x 1.5
3 1.4 x 4.5 2.2 x 4.5 3.0 x 3.0 3.0 x 3.0
4 1.4 x 6.0 2.2 x 6.0
Single Row Layout – For each additional container add at least the following discrete area while maintaining a rectangular area overall:  1.4 x 1.5 2.2 x 1.5    
Single Row Layout (Not Enclosed) – Minimum additional clearance space required to front of row:  0.8 x row length      
Opposing Row Layout – For each additional container or pair of containers add at least the following discrete area while maintaining a rectangular area overall:      3.0 x 1.5 3.0 x 1.5
Thus, for example, 5 bins would need a dedicated storage area of at least:  1.4 x 7.5 (plus an adjacent usable clear area of 0.8 x 7.5 to make a total area of 2.2 x 7.5)  2.2 x 7.5 3.0 x 4.5 3.0 x 4.5
Minimum Door or Gate Clearance    1.5   1.5
Minimum Operating Corridor (2 or more containers in a row; 2 or more containers opposing) 1.3

Source: Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland (2010)


Table 10: Container Capacity 1100L

Number of containers Minimum storage area dimensions (m)
Single row layout Opposing rows layout
Not enclosed Enclosed Not enclosed Enclosed
1-2 1.8 x 3.2 3.1 x 3.2 4.4 x 1.6 4.4 x 1.6
3 1.8 x 4.8 3.1 x 4.8 4.4 x 3.2 4.4 x 3.2
4 1.8 x 6.4 3.1 x 6.4 - -
Single Row Layout – For each additional container add at least the following discrete area while maintaining a rectangular area overall:  1.8 x 1.6 3.1 x 1.6 - -
Single Row Layout (Not Enclosed) – Minimum additional clearance space required to front of row:  1.3 x row length - - -
Opposing Row Layout – For each additional container or pair of containers add at least the following discrete area while maintaining a rectangular area overall:  - - 4.4 x 1.6 4.4 x 1.6
Thus, for example, 5 bins would need a dedicated storage area of at least:  1.5 x 8.0 (plus an adjacent usable clear area of 1.3 x 8.0 to make a total area of 3.1 x 8.0) 3.1 x 8.0 4.4 x 4.8 4.4 x 4.8
Minimum Door or Gate Clearance  - 2.0 - 2.0
Minimum Operating Corridor (2 or more containers in a row; 2 or more containers opposing) 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8

Source: Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland (2010)


Figure 3: Wheeled Bin Storage layout

Wheeled bins in a single row layout (not to scale)

""

Wheeled bins in opposing row layout (not to scale)

""
 

Source: Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland (2010)


Table 11: Collection Frequency and Storage Capacity for Non-Domestic Properties

Collection Frequency Minimum Storage Capacity
Once per week One week’s waste
2-5 days per week Four days’ waste
6-7 days per week Two days’ waste
For properties where the frequency of collection has not been established, capacity should be provided for a weekly (once per week) collection.
Note that a 7 day collection would not be widely available

Source: Local Government Waste Storage Guide for Northern Ireland (2010)


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