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Red-tailed black cockatoo

Calyptorhynchus banksii


Red-tailed black cockatoos are common in parts of Australia but, in some parts of southern Australia, they are considered endangered.

Old gum trees that previously provided nesting hollows for the cockatoos are disappearing and are often used as firewood, resulting in a loss of habitat for the birds. The stringy tree bark which provides the cockatoos’ main food source is also disappearing.

Animal class

Bird

Conservation status

The IUCN does not consider the red-tailed black cockatoo to be currently endangered. They are listed under Appendix II of CITES.

Habitat

Forest

Population

There are no estimates for the global population of these cockatoos but there is evidence to show that their numbers have decreased. In south-east Australia, there are now less than 1,000 birds.

Diet

Herbivore/Insectivore. Red-tailed black cockatoos eat mostly seeds but also eat nuts, fruits, flowers, bulbs and insects.